4 in Translation By Naguib Mahfouz Medal Winner Huzama Habayeb

Abu Hafez scratched his balls beneath the table with one hand and with the other straightened his coarse moustache. For the old-timers of the coffee shop, their desire to know what happened had become a burning, tantalising compulsion that cooled somewhat when Abu Shawkat paused.           Keep reading. There you were:

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Other People’s Children, Part 3, or Ghost Touches: Myriam Gurba’s “Mean” and Sexual Violence

It takes us a while, though, to get to Gurba’s rape, and the details, as she admits, aren’t fully forthcoming. That story, itself, recalls an earlier version in which the same god demands the sacrifice of his servant’s son as a test of loyalty. […] Being mean to boys is fun and a second-wave feminist

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The Legacy of Eric Garner: Policing Still Going Wrong

In I Can’t Breathe, Taibbi titles almost all of his chapters after an individual whose experience prompts a wider discussion about the Garner story and the black experience with the American justice system. Thompson would have referred to as the System. Donald Trump has never quite said that, but his appeals to white supremacists before

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Naguib Mahfouz Medal for Literature to Huzama Habayeb for ‘A New Kind of Palestinian Novel’

Early   in the novel, Hawwa travels through the furrowed alley to take the cramped bus from the camp to the workshop   of the beautiful Syrian seamstress Qamar in the city. Judge Shereen Abouelnaga likened it to Hoda Barakat’s   Tiller of Waters,   another novel with fabric as a central motif, writing that,

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Anti-Fascism Beyond the Headlines: Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore Interviews Mark Bray

One month after publication, the book is already on its third printing. Defining fascism prior to 1945 can be a fraught endeavor, especially since fascists casually adopted and abandoned ideas. I’m fascinated by an interview on MSNBC where you were featured alongside Richard Cohen, the president of the Southern Poverty Law Center, which could be

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Naguib Mahfouz Day: Teaching, Translating, Memories, and More

It was December 11, 1911 when Naguib Mahfouz — Arabic literature’s most-translated modern author and its only Nobel laureate — was born: Mahfouz was born to a family of seven children, but was distant from the hubbub, as he was born ten years after the next-youngest sibling. Although trained as a philosopher, at the core

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Acquisition and Empire: On James Delbourgo’s “Collecting the World”

“At one end of the spectrum, Lady Sloane’s Jamaican income played a major role in Sloane’s fortunes while, at the other, unnamed slave women gathered specimens for colonial collectors who sent them back to patrons like James Petiver and Sloane.” His career as collector was subsidized, in other words, by income from slave labor on

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Sunday Submissions: Global Queer Playwriting/Queer Plays in Translation

For its 2018 season, the Arcola Queer Collective is soliciting works in translation from around the world: They write: We will stage four rehearsed readings of queer plays in translation and from parts of the world that are currently less represented on the LGBT+ stages of London. To achieve this, we are putting out a

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Books Fall Apart: On Nancy Perloff’s “Explodity: Sound, Image, and Word in Russian Futurist Book Art”

Following Linda Dalrymple Henderson’s fascinating study of the effect of the spatial, pre-relativity concept of the fourth dimension on avant-garde art in the 1910s, Perloff attributes much about the principal concept of mirskontsa to the influence of Peter Ouspensky’s Tertium Organum, published in Saint Petersburg in 1912, which argued that time does not exist but

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Moroccan Author Chourouq Nasri’s ‘Blue in Green’ Longlisted for 2017 Short Story Day Africa Prize

The other stories on the longlist: 1. ‘Transubstantiation’ by Genna Gardini – South Africa 15. ‘South of Samora’ by Farai Mudzingwa – Zimbabwe The three-story shortlist is set to be announced early next year. ‘Who We Were Then, Who We Are Now’ by Nadu Ologoudou – Benin 6. Most recently, she was one of the

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The Surprising Evolution of “Beren and Lúthien”

It likewise proves instructive when viewed diachronically, meaningfully illustrating the evolution of ideas that underlies the final text. Marketing emphasized a return to Middle-earth and the (singular) epic love story, rather than the editorial strategy that declines to present a definitive text. (Her mother, whose role is limited to offering advice and insight, and a

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The Impossibility of Children’s Cinema: On Todd Haynes’s “Wonderstruck”

But that’s a guess. Deafness is pictured as a loss, a kind of vulnerability. There are stuffed giraffes and dinosaurs and awe-struck children. I keep coming back to the image of the child under glass for the ways it so neatly crystallizes the lifelessness necessary for a collector’s art. Rose stands in front of a

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LARB Radio Hour: “Controversial Jews” With Heidi Ewing, Rachel Grady, and Eric Lax on Woody Allen

Eric explains what he sought to reveal in a book that documents the production of Allen’s 2015 film Irrational Man from start to finish: a unique, quirky master-craftsman at work doing what so few get to do, make films just the way he wants. In the first, the celebrated documentary team of Heidi Ewing and

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Other People’s Children, Part 2: Stories in the Aftermath, or “The Hate U Give”

Its willingness to go to the hard places challenges readers to consider, for instance, if a young black man deserves to die regardless of his criminal history. The personal trauma is certainly there: the pounding baseline of a rap song heard on the radio all too easily recalls the staccato gunshots that killed her friend.

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