“And My Frigidaire is Here!”: Gender and Family Life in Postwar France

¤ John Merriman teaches French and Modern European history at Yale University. Fatherhood “was becoming a relationship.” In 1946, the French government began to grant fathers a three-day paternity leave in the first two weeks after birth. The Vichy regime even claimed that attempts at women’s liberation had contributed to the fall of France to

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Endless Houses or Vast Potatoes? The Impossible Architecture of Frederick Kiesler

Politically, he might be a risk, and financially he is a liability in most cases. The Laboratory was an experimental space in which Kiesler investigated design alongside biology, sociology, and art with a small group of graduate students. “Glad we don’t live here.” This problem stands in counterpoint to another major criticism of Kiesler’s work:

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Friday Finds: ‘Under the Midmorning Sun’ and 5 More By Ibrahim Nasrallah

Nora Parr has translated an excerpt from Ibrahim Nasrallah’s   Under the Midmorning Sun (Taḥta shams al-ḍuḥā, Arab Scientific Publishers, Beirut, 2004) for the journal Politics / Letters: The novel, as Parr notes, was initially published as a twin set, under the title Aʻrās āmina taḥta shams al-ḍuḥā   (Safe Weddings Under the Midmorning Sun),

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LARB Radio Hour: Joyce Carol Oates, Morgan Parker, and Fiona Maazel at the LA Times Festival of Books

Joyce Carol Oates remains one of the leading figures in contemporary American letters, a status she has held for many decades. LARB Radio Hour: Joyce Carol Oates, Morgan Parker, and Fiona Maazel at the LA Times Festival of Books By LARB AV –  May 25, 2017 LARB Radio’s Kate Wolf, Medaya Ocher, and Eric Newman spoke

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Promises, Promises: The Strange History of Film and the Armenian Genocide

The edited version of the script, which is held in the National Archives, is a confusing mess, and must have left many viewers scratching their heads after leaving the theater. The controversy made distribution almost impossible and resulted in huge financial losses. Despite these endorsements, critically acclaimed performances, and a big budget, The Promise was

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Heroes and Villains in Ken Liu’s “The Wall of Storms”

Yet The Wall of Storms also borrows heavily from traditions of Western literature: Storms is a romance narrative. While the Lyucu mindlessly slay under a murderous objectifying ideology, the Ano value diversity, collaboration, and choice above all else. It resists contemporary impulses to write or read Chinese-American literature as autobiography, and it provides a complex

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ArabLit’s Summer 2017 Recommendations and Where to Read Them: Beach? Bar? Darkened Closet?

“Scents and Flavors   doesn′t look like a contemporary cookbook: there are no glossy photos, no oven-temperature markings and often no precise measurements. But the narrator of these diaries doesn′t stand apart from events. “Strangely overlooked is Fadel’s novel A Beautiful White Cat Walks With Me, published in Arabic in 2011 and now in artful

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The Dance of Grief: On Amelia Gray’s “Isadora”

Gray’s does, however. The marrow seemed too vital, a fundamental pudding. At least they delivered on the eternity they advertised. One man holds a parade for his dead mother, replete with “floats representing her spinach casserole and childhood home” while a lost child’s bedroom “was filled with candy until the window broke, spilling wrapped butterscotch

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Notes on “RuPaul’s Drag Race”

Shangela, originally a contestant on season two, then a surprise contestant on season three, makes periodic reappearances throughout the show, often leaping out of unexpected boxes to shout her catchphrase, “halleloo!” Drag is self-referential. It’s also good to be “sickening.” A well-made-up face is “well beaten.” Drag Race has its own vocabulary. Each episode begins

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Bookmaking for Children in Egypt: Prizes, Initiatives, and Challenges

Both Elkholy and Yasmine Motawy   had previously been judges for   Hans Christian Andersen Award,   the industry’s most prestigious, given to an author and illustrator of children’s books whose complete works have made a “lasting contribution to children’s literature.” The Danish award is considered a   “Nobel Prize” for children’s literature. Here, what

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Among Denys Johnson-Davies’ Favorites: ‘The Island of Animals’

provides readers with excellent translations, faithful to the original texts but rendered in clear prose, of classical Islamic source materials,” while another review complains that the “designs sometimes repeat.” Davies’ translation was also adapted to the stage   at Golden Thread Theatre, in 2006, by   director Hafiz Karmali. John Esposito wrote it was, “An

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Have a Carrot, Have Two

Both authors obviously have enough street cred and the background knowledge to offer compelling insights into this remarkable woman. According to Gary, “When Margaret made a seemingly innocuous comment that she liked lightning and thunder […] Michael raged at her. They fell in love with each other, and as reported in both books, it certainly

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Remaking the University: The Idea of the English University

“Idea” literature has therefore stood as one side of an ongoing debate about universities: it has been “constantly seeking to crystallize what is entailed by the logic of open-ended enquiry,” whereas, Collini continues, “‘needs of society’ statements are constantly attempting to rein in the consequences of an excessive attachment to that ideal as it has

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