Catalonia in Peril: On Manuel de Pedrolo’s “Typescript of the Second Origin”

In Typescript’s dystopian setting, Alba’s leadership and wisdom — particularly in saving all human knowledge possible — constitutes the novel’s feminist message. The biblical influence is not limited to this narrative pattern, but also implied by the novel’s structure: the paragraphs of its five “Notebooks,” supposedly typescript versions of Alba’s handwritten notebooks, are numbered. ¤

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The Mirror and the Window: An Interview With Saadia Faruqi

That’s disappointing some days, heartbreaking other days, but mostly it just energizes me to keep writing. Although Yasmin’s ethnic identity and faith are not major plot points, Saadia weaves them into her stories; they’re there when Yasmin’s mom puts on a hijab to go to the market, and in the way Yasmin calls her dad

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Bodies Without Bodies

Ramiro has returned to bodily existence from flotation to track down his former best friend, who betrayed him many decades earlier. Familiar categories have not ceased to exist, but since the body has been demoted to avatar status, it does not offer a sense of stable identity. He has returned to physical existence through the

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Suffering Visible: The Ravages of Postcolonial Capitalism in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s “This Mournable Body”

“[T]here is nothing you can do or say since it is already done,” she thinks. Tambu’s foray into the role of social disciplinarian nearly breaks her. Tambu finds this inexplicable: “You grow increasingly galled by your cousin and her assumption that everyone has the luxury she has of surviving without being obsessed with one’s own

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Motherhood and Migration: An Interview with Vanessa Hua on “A River of Stars”

It’s our origin myth. While I was reading it, my son started daycare, and I’ve grappled with wanting to be with him but also needing and wanting to work. What will my life have meant? With Scarlett, her journey is not just about survival, but also expansion. Why was telling this story important to you?

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so, Ecstasy

    ¤   so, Ecstasy And after LOVE had wept and eaten The burning heart, my burning Heart, and LOVE our Lord, Lord, Lord So awakened but not in horror but, yes, berserk, so: Human, so wanted beyond, so: ECSTASY, So: not human but ALL as in without ORDER, So wept, made into the

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Alive in a Magic Democracy: On “The Real Lolita”

¤ Though she is only quoted saying roughly 2,000 words in a novel of 112,473, Lolita miraculously manages both to express her own narrative and to subvert Humbert’s. While the novel does silence, both through rape and through narration, the persistence of its titular character demonstrates how, in fiction, even the voiceless can be heard.

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The Dust on a Butterfly’s Wing: On Sarah Weinman’s Investigation of “The Real Lolita”

We see his literary friendships and his literary compulsions. I found myself probing absence as much as presence, relying on inference and informed speculation as much as fact.” As we read through this mesmerizing book, Weinman’s obsession becomes the reader’s obsession. Months later, in mid-June, he approached her on her way home from school, and

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Your Child, Your Choice: How the United States Made Parenting Impossible

This is well known. And yes, there’s plenty to pin on the for their deliberate undermining of most families. In short, with the “my child, my choice” battle cry, economically secure white women ignored that there’s no “choice” if you don’t have money to pay for the procedure or insurance to cover it. The horror

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An Ode to New-Metal Man: David R. Bunch’s “Moderan”

He is sometimes compared to Cordwainer Smith and R. One of the most astute discoverers of talent in SF history, Goldsmith published the first stories of Thomas M. These are not simply combat machines — “the White Witch rockets firing, the wow bombs grandly falling, the wreck-wrecks trajectoring, the missiles far and wide homing and

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The Frame of Things

SEPTEMBER 10, 2018 THE 19TH CENTURY, violent and progressive and anxious and confident all at once, seems to be getting closer to us the further it recedes into the past. “[A]ll the most important questions of Europe and humankind in our day are forever being raised simultaneously,” Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky commented in 1877. Like

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David Foster Wallace in the #MeToo Era: A Conversation with Clare Hayes-Brady

Actually, there are a large number of really brilliant female scholars working on Wallace and a number of very gifted scholars of color working on him from the perspective of gender and racial politics. So the backlash was really important and has led to a real vibrancy in Wallace Studies. There’s a certain corner of

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