Every Woman’s Story: In Conversation with Paula McLain About Gellhorn and Hemingway

To have to apologize for that or to be constantly defending this relationship. I think she and Hemingway were well matched in their craving for intense experience. It took me a long time to finish because it was so difficult to read about the struggles and disappointments and losses, and I would have to put

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Russian Cosmism Versus Interstellar Bosses: Reclaiming Full-Throttle Luxury Space Communism

¤ Aaron Winslow’s novel, Jobs of the Great Misery (2016), is available from Skeleton Man Press. And as any librarian knows, the biggest limit to collecting materials — be they books or humans — is storage space, which is why Fedorov ultimately demands human colonization of the cosmos. Russian Cosmism also illustrates the fine line

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In Defense of the Medium

With the exception of chapters on the representation of war and the experience of growing up queer, which focus respectively on Joe Sacco and Alison Bechdel, Chute frames her analysis around multiple cartoonists working in broad rubrics such as “girls,” “sex,” “cities,” and “punk.” Some of these chapters seek to establish lineages across generations, whereas

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At a Certain Age and Searching for Meaning: Anne Tyler’s “Clock Dance”

Age has mellowed her, and she rolls with the quirks of Cheryl’s home and neighborhood, its rituals and characters. This is not Peter’s mission anyway. He alternates between watching CNN, pacing the house for a decent wi-fi signal, and complaining. One day, she’s gathered with the neighbors — old Mrs. Instead, she evaluates her life.

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LARB Radio Hour: The Poverty of Wealth with Lauren Greenfield

Lauren joins co-hosts Eric Newman and Kate Wolf to discuss her new film Generation Wealth, which, she explains, contrasts with her previous work because it shows how her super-wealthy subjects had a come-to-Jesus moment in the wake of the spectacular market crash of 2008 and subsequent Great Recession, which seemed, once-and-for-all, to kill the Greed is Good

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Assembling a New Left

Assembly’s calls and responses also evoke the back-and-forth dynamic of Occupy’s general assembly. But they immediately note the tendency of such movements to dissipate over time. He received his PhD in history from the University of California, Berkeley. Intellectual property such as images and code take precedence over physical property. Punitive institutions such as prisons

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From Watching to Participating: Kate Bredeson and Lars Jan Discuss 1968 and Jan’s Stage Production of Joan Didion’s “The White Album”

She knows that she doesn’t get everything just right, because who does? I’m also interested in failure. 1968 — and the late ’60s in general — is when a lot of young people were really the engines of political and social movements on many fronts. What are you thinking about in terms of making theater

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Stories as Prayer: A Conversation Between Joshua Cohen and Harold Bloom

The rest is the madness of art.”) — is a far darker version of this theme of intergenerational literary encounter that James returned to time and again, imbuing it with cranky humor in “The Death of the Lion” and with tender mystery in “The Figure in the Carpet.” Tellingly, it was only as my train

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Originalism on Trial

These cases, Hasen concludes, reflect Scalia’s “distrust of government and his strong belief in personal privacy.” But that strong belief did not extend to the constitutional right of privacy that the court announced in Griswold v. As the title suggests, Hasen is not a Scalia devotee. Dukes that denied class-action status to women suing the

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The Political Print: On David Francis Taylor’s “The Politics of Parody”

This was a time when printmakers had unprecedented power. As for the print’s allusive source, it was apparent to a broader audience than those familiar with Paradise Lost or even with Shakespeare’s plays, for Gulliver’s Travels (1726) was more widely read than either. He might also have refrained from mentioning, as often as he does,

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A Science of Exceptions: On Michel Serres’s “The Birth of Physics”

Rather than seeking the universal laws or forms into which phenomena may be shoehorned, the atomist approach aims to explain how true innovations emerge and how new things are born. Sense forms from an inclination, a swerve, or change in orientation of some random element or elements. AUGUST 14, 2018 IN THE BEGINNING was the

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Beyond the Lyme Wars

Though Khakpour never abandons her belief that she has chronic Lyme, she doesn’t insist that her readers believe she does. Her website is www.suzannekoven.com. But Khakpour is no activist, and Sick is not an illness manifesto. We’re gonna run every test there is.” With each medical encounter, Khakpour risks harm. We’d help her. ¤ When

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Revolt and Revulsion in Margarita García Robayo’s “Fish Soup”

As for the perpetrators, Most likely, all that would happen is that the boys would be sent abroad for a while. Her hopes are pinned on Juan, a.k.a. AUGUST 14, 2018 THE UNNAMED NARRATOR of Margarita García Robayo’s novella Waiting for a Hurricane goes through her early 20s taking precisely what she needs from men.

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To Endure the Void: On Rachel Cusk’s “Outline” Trilogy

The controversy began with her first memoir, A Life’s Work: On Becoming a Mother, described by The New York Times as “career suicide,” in which Cusk describes motherhood as “a form of disability,” a prison from which she is forever plotting her escape. Now I imagine a different kind of knowledge, knowledge without exposure, without

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