“Whatever Was Left of That Other Life”: On Adam O’Riordan’s “A Herring Famine” and “The Burning Ground: Stories”

In “Christ of Taüll,” the speaker “stare[s] into the face” of the eponymous Savior, recalling a scene of murder on a church’s steps and performing a quietly remarkable sleight of hand. Luckily, he’s a fine writer, even if “Rambla Pacifico,” a rheumy fixer’s quest to rescue his boss’s daughter from a kidnapping, with the aid

Continue reading “Whatever Was Left of That Other Life”: On Adam O’Riordan’s “A Herring Famine” and “The Burning Ground: Stories”

From Elsewhere to Elsewhere

The opening chapters, which feature three wanderers traversing a disaster zone, allude to Tarkovsky’s Stalker and to Arkady and Boris Strugatsky’s Roadside Picnic, the inspiration for that film. Radiant Terminus is the longest of Volodine’s narratives to appear in English, and it offers more of a sustained lineal narrative than much of his previously translated

Continue reading From Elsewhere to Elsewhere

“I Know That Story!”: On Natalia Ginzburg’s “Family Lexicon”

And when we fled from that place, he wore on his face the expression that he’d had when he came to our apartment for Turati; it was that breathless, terrified, and excited expression he wore whenever he was helping someone to safety. In the author’s “Avvertenza” (“warning”) that opens the book, Ginzburg states rather elliptically,

Continue reading “I Know That Story!”: On Natalia Ginzburg’s “Family Lexicon”

Between Philosophy and History: On Guido Mazzoni’s “Theory of the Novel”

After his philosophical introduction to the theory of the novel, Mazzoni delineates the “Origin of the Novel” using three parameters: semantics, geography, and history. To begin with, narrative forms and their capacity to tell a story stem from two families: “one group includes le roman, der Roman, and il romanzo; the other, the novel and

Continue reading Between Philosophy and History: On Guido Mazzoni’s “Theory of the Novel”

‘Translate at City’ Co-winners About Why the Summer Program Works, How It Could Be Better

PR:   Comma Press   offered us a choice from several short stories from two forthcoming books, ‘Iraq + 100’ and ‘The Sea Cloak.’ We were then asked to translate a short extract of our choice by a deadline and, if they liked the translation, then it would be used in the final book. Perween

Continue reading ‘Translate at City’ Co-winners About Why the Summer Program Works, How It Could Be Better

There Is a Country to Be Built: A Conversation with Jess Rizkallah, Winner of the Etel Adnan Poetry Prize

But viewing your body however you choose is revolutionary, too. They’re very informed by stories from my family members. Your poems often use body imagery to depict psychological pain, separation, shame, alienation, et cetera. Here she and Carol N. My relationships with these places are half my own and half learned history. I’ve also always

Continue reading There Is a Country to Be Built: A Conversation with Jess Rizkallah, Winner of the Etel Adnan Poetry Prize

Two Jabbour Douaihy Novels Signed by Interlink, Other Recent Deals

Yale University Press (World English). Khaled Khalifa’s Death is Hard Work: -De Geus (Dutch) -Sindbad, Actes Sud (French). The full list, from Raya’s most recent mailing: Dima Wannous’s   The Frightened: -Blessing, Random House (German) -Baldini & Castoldi (Italian) -Gallimard (French) (Previously: Signatuur, AW Bruna (Dutch). Several are worth noting: There have been multiple sales

Continue reading Two Jabbour Douaihy Novels Signed by Interlink, Other Recent Deals

George Prochnik on Gershom Scholem, Walter Benjamin, and Jerusalem; Elif Batuman, “The People in Trees”

George Prochnik on Gershom Scholem, Walter Benjamin, and Jerusalem; Elif Batuman, “The People in Trees” By LARB AV –  April 13, 2017 George   Prochnik is one of our leading biographers and cultural historians; and he talks with Kate and Medaya about his latest book, Stranger in a Strange Land: Gershom Scholem and Jerusalem. As he

Continue reading George Prochnik on Gershom Scholem, Walter Benjamin, and Jerusalem; Elif Batuman, “The People in Trees”

Beyond the Confines of Race and Culture: “Hola and Goodbye: Una Familia in Stories”

Later that night, she overhears her mother tell her father, “Can you imagine? And in this story she decides that, yes, she will attend her 25-year high school reunion. But they have not seen each other since graduation, and Miscolta could have easily, and realistically, made a big deal of the first time they meet

Continue reading Beyond the Confines of Race and Culture: “Hola and Goodbye: Una Familia in Stories”

How to Be Torn-Between

Chew-Bose’s writing about her parents is not only about immigrant experience, but about parents in general — about aging, as a child, and recognizing the delicately squandered potential of knowing your parents as they were when you were young. A sixth sense I’ve long guessed is special to those who are born with leftover matter

Continue reading How to Be Torn-Between

Translator Alex Elinson on Novelist Youssef Fadel’s Shift Away from Colloquial

Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Celebrated Kidlit Author and Publisher Amal Farah on Surprises, Processes, and WishesCategories: Morocco And that was his audience. “So I don’t know if the suggestion to not include Moroccan Arabic [came from the publisher]. And that’s a very difficult thing to do — to write colloquially but in a pan-Arabic kind

Continue reading Translator Alex Elinson on Novelist Youssef Fadel’s Shift Away from Colloquial

Migrant Vernaculars: Deepak Unnikrishnan’s “Temporary People”

Deepak Unnikrishnan’s debut novel Temporary People takes as its subject the migrant communities of the United Arab Emirates. Figurative emasculation becomes literal: Tits, egged on by the narrator calling him a “pussy,” physically attacks the Arab boy. Mukundun disappears one day to the relief of most of his family. Make him drive until his wife

Continue reading Migrant Vernaculars: Deepak Unnikrishnan’s “Temporary People”

Celebrated Kidlit Author and Publisher Amal Farah on Surprises, Processes, and Wishes

But when I am busy with a particular book, I write for more than eight   hours a day without actual writing. AF: Unfortunately, I do not have such friendships, although I do wish we had literary groups that supported the writing practice of its members. 1287. I am also the type of writer who

Continue reading Celebrated Kidlit Author and Publisher Amal Farah on Surprises, Processes, and Wishes

Sun, Hum, and Shade

When she finally does steel herself for a visit, it does not send her deeper down the “rabbit hole of loss”; rather, the cemetery is enlivening. First thing in the morning, a reminder: this will alter, will not be recalled as it is. Try rather to see, however you can.” As demonstrated by her mother,

Continue reading Sun, Hum, and Shade