“I Need You to Check Your Eyes”: Alex Dimitrov Gets Intimate

O’Hara lays this out in his tongue-in-cheek manifesto, “Personism,” in which he advocates for a poetry that eschews the idea of a general audience and addresses itself to one person instead. The central hook for the piece is the idea that Dimitrov started the salon, at least partially, to cruise. Time slides through the flesh.

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PalFest 2017 Opens May 13: Featuring Ma’n Abu Taleb, Nadeem Aslam, Jelani Cobb, Solmaz Sharif, More

In an email newsletter, PalFest organizers said: “PalFest is unable to get to Gaza because of Israel and Egypt’s ongoing siege of the Strip.” You can also follow @PalFest, from this weekend,   for details on the writers’ crossing into the West Bank from Jordan. In addition to events in four cities, the international group

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Only Desert in China Lake

MAY 10, 2017 IN 2017, calling climate change a “catastrophe” just proves you read the news. This is the close of Baumgart’s personal journey (followed only by a fact- and stats-driven epilogue) — his vision of the road forward: “Only desert.” Perhaps he inherited his bleak outlook from his mother. But it also explains why

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The American Sputnik: Van Cliburn Heats Up the Cold War

Listening to the recordings of the live broadcasts from Moscow, you hear an inimitable talent cresting at a moment of rarefied discovery. The bookend to Cliburn’s ticker-tape parade comes when, at 53, he appeared at Mikhail Gorbachev’s visit to the White House for a “Washington Summit,” in 1987. He canceled as many recitals as he

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Coming in August: Mazen Kerbaj’s ‘Beirut Won’t Cry,’ Finally in English

You can also read a number of Kerbaj’s comix on Words Without Borders. Drawn and written in English, French, and Arabic,   Beirut Won’t Cry   shows us how an artist views the world and everything in it — his relationships, his family, and his creative pursuits — as it crumbles violently around him. Meanwhile,

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One Sentence on Top of Another: On László Krasznahorkai’s “The Last Wolf”

The modern European sentence has a history of transformation that’s as complex as it is long, but a shortened and sinfully simplistic, potted version might look something like this: Departing from the serpentine textures of Renaissance stylists like Thomas Browne and Robert Burton, the sentence underwent a process of refinement, if not shortening, which culminated,

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‘We the Aliens,’ ‘Nakba + 100,’ and Palestinian Science Fictions

To coincide with Palestinian artist Larissa Sensor’s exhibition at Bluecoat,   “In the Future, They Ate from the Finest Porcelain,” Comma Press asks   three Palestinian fiction writers: What might a new wave Palestinian science fiction look like? The event — set for June 14 — comes just a month before   Mo’min Swaitat’s play

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Streetwalker

(She places her feminist character Mary Datchet in a Bloomsbury bedsit in her novel Night and Day). Elkin’s offering is a welcome rejoinder to the stock image of the flâneur with his cane, top hat, and ease, thanks to her consideration of a variety of smart and fascinating women. Taking the metro with that same

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Love in the Time of Lotus

She spent nearly four years in China. Zhang’s lens zooms in and out, balancing Lotus and Bing’s personal lives with critiques of the sociopolitical climate as a whole. These expressions — like “Her Beauty Outshines the Moon and Puts the Flowers to Shame” and “Heaven is High and the Emperor is Far Away” — offer

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The Fragility of Politics: What Paul Ricoeur Can Teach Us About the French Election

Ricoeur was not an apologist for suspicion, but instead a defender of humanism, one who saw opposing ideas or ideals not in terms of dichotomies, but in terms of dialectics. An international school dedicated to pacifist ideals, the Collège Cévenol — still open these many years — is nestled in Le Chambon-sur-Lignon, the Protestant village

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The Soul of the Body: William Empson’s “The Face of the Buddha”

(For a corrective, I advise reading Georges Dreyfus’s remarkable philosophical memoir The Sound of Two Hands Clapping.) But Empson’s instincts are generally sure-footed enough that he manages a respectable comparative study even in the face of large knowledge gaps. As John Haffenden’s biography chronicles, Empson had had a mild Anglican upbringing which did not take

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Sunday Submissions: ‘Transference’ Seeks Translated Arabic Poems for Fall 2017 Issue

Transference is published through the Department of World Languages and Literatures at Western Michigan University. The journal Transference is currently   inviting submissions of Arabic poetry translated into English: They’re also interested in poems   from the   Chinese, French, Old French, German, Classical Greek, Latin, or Japanese. It’s currently edited by   David Kutzko

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Shades of Gray and Black

Sonia looks at the television blankly in the first two panels, then in the third looks with the same wordless blankness at the viewer, or perhaps Kristen. This is a riveting use of memoir. Inside the cathedral, Seth, an urban explorer from the real world who was hit by a train and died while photographing

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An Unkempt Jeremiad

Half of the crowd was in half-naked costume, and half of those who weren’t were doing the full Monty. I would affirm that The People’s Police is a continuous pleasure to read were it not for the poor production values that persistently hobble the story. Still an unregenerate hippie at age 77, Spinrad revels in

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