Freud: A Star Is Born

Indeed, the second episode of the Netflix show recreates, nearly shot-for-shot, the opening sequence of John Huston’s Freud: The Secret Passion (1962), in which Montgomery Clift played Freud and which is easily the best filmed version of Freud’s life. In order to prove her paralytic symptoms are genuine — if of non-organic origin — Freud

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Kim Gordon, Quarantined

Was that a conscious decision? Even in countries that are democratic-socialist democracies, their cultures can be just as homogenized. There’s an eerie Richard Prince painting on the cover of Sonic Youth’s 2004 album Sonic Nurse that features a nurse, whose face is partially obscured by a surgical mask — the kind everyone is now wearing

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The Television is the Night Car: An Interview with Graeme Manson about Snowpiercer

TV wants faster worldbuilding, so the first episode needed to introduce the world of the train and follow the A story of Layton [Daveed Diggs]. A lot of it wasn’t really germane, but it was interesting. They fulfill the charge from Rochette that we’re to look for a better future. Yeah, you can imagine TNT

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For Crying Out Loud

I’d like to think that Critchley is after a book akin to Janet Malcolm’s Forty-One False Starts, a collection of loosely related vignettes, which cast light and shadow, in exactly the right proportion, on the ambiguous nature of the creative life. In Critchley’s words, Antigone’s story “doesn’t mean that we are somehow free of the

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How to Miss What Isn’t Gone: Thoughts on Modern Nostalgias While Watching “The Office”

Teachers are people who, when they were students, did whatever a teacher asked; it’s a hard lesson to learn that obedience is a different thing than taste. Increasingly, I think what we were looking for in the book, maybe even the name, was not gesturing forward at the expectation of having a child but reminding

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Sunday Submissions: Theatre Translator Mentorship

Sunday Submissions: Theatre Translator Mentorship The deadline for applications to the Foreign Affairs’ Theatre Translator Mentorship have been extended until June 4: From a 2017 in-person workshop. The program, they write, “is based on our approach to working with translated play texts and our experiences of bringing world drama from ‘page to stage’ over nearly

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Celebrate with a Feast: A Conversation with Irina Georgescu

I love your question, because it captures what actually happens in a traditional Romanian restaurant. You talk of “old Bucharest, with traditional urban houses and two storey buildings from the 19th century, cobbled streets, overflowing fruit orchards and hanging grape vines. Writing about food while being right in the middle of one of the most

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Bulaq 49: Locked-in Lit

More difficult to pick up right now was Aziz Binebine’s   Tazmamort récit, a prison memoir that recently appeared in English as   Tazmamart,   translated by Lulu Norman. Ursula had enjoyed Alessandro Manzoni’s   I Promessi Sposi,   a classic of Italian literature that recounts a 17th century plague in Milan, while MLQ found

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