When Israel Was Socialist

She recognizes that she was at the time “blind” to this injustice. When writing about the Israeli inequality she began to notice, she fails, however, to mention the Palestinians or any non-Jews, focusing instead only on intra-Jewish inequality. The Israel-Palestine peace process is now effectively over, and Israel’s politics are now dominated by the right

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“There Are No Angels — Only Heavy Islands”: On Claire Meuschke’s “Upend”

Meuschke’s responses to this immigration document unfold throughout the text, erasing and repurposing its language and symbols. The speaker does not reveal until the long essay “Mechanical Bull” toward the end of the collection that her father worked as a house painter in the Bay Area during the 1970s. The fan deck, which is designed

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River Phoenix: A Poem

MAY 30, 2020 LIKE SO MANY NONPROFITS AND LITERARY COMMUNITIES, MANY OF LARB’S FUNDRAISING SOURCES HAVE BEEN UPENDED. IN ORDER TO CONTINUE PROVIDING FREE COVERAGE OF THE BEST IN WRITING AND THOUGHT, WE ARE RELYING ON YOUR SUPPORT NOW MORE THAN EVER. ¤ River Phoenix In my own private Idaho I’m in bed with River

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Etel Adnan’s ‘Time’ Wins Best Translated Book Award

This year’s novel prize went to Daša Drndić’s EEG, translated by Celia Hawkesworth. Of Time, the jury said, in a prepared statement: Members of this year’s poetry jury were:   Nancy Naomi Carlson (poet and translator), Patricia Lockwood   (poet), Aditi Machado   (poet and translator), Laura Marris   (writer and translator), Brandon Shimoda  

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The Art of Persuasion: On Gilberto Perez’s “The Eloquent Screen: A Rhetoric of Film”

By claiming to define a “rhetoric of film,” Perez ostensibly takes the other path, attempting to define film as a rhetorical object. In short, every rhetorical object, from a billboard to an inaugural address, must be judged according to where the rhetor found their ideas, how the ideas are organized, the ways in which the

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Friday Finds: Samah Selim on Translation into and out of Arabic

Friday Finds: Samah Selim on Translation into and out of Arabic Recently, on   Asymptote,   Rebecca Ruth Gould talked to translator, writer, and scholar Samah Selim   about   translating nonfiction, about critical apparatuses, and the Cairo-based translator collective, Turjoman: Of Turjoman, Selim said: We wanted to think about how to change this landscape:

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Wanting to Turn Back Time: On Aimee Liu’s “Glorious Boy”

Claire is ahead of her time in many of her observations. She is also prone to self-judgment and self-analysis, recognizing she’d gone to the Andaman Islands “mistaking youthful ambition as a virtue,” realizing that “ambition is worthless unless it’s rooted in human understanding.” She wonders why she thought herself qualified to undertake to communicate with

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Beshara Doumani, Brown University’s First Mahmoud Darwish Chair

Beshara Doumani, Brown University’s First Mahmoud Darwish Chair Earlier this week, Brown University announced a new faculty chair in Palestinian Studies, named for   Mahmoud Darwish. Doumani also has a literary essay titled “A Song from Haifa” in   Seeking Palestine: New Palestinian Writing on Exile and Home, edited by Raja Shehadeh, which opens with

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The Footmen of Liberalism

MAY 27, 2020 PICTURE YOURSELF, if you can, settling into business class on a transatlantic flight. A jostling group of ambitious characters emerges. Zevin writes that “one cover showed a nameless Indian girl clutching a blanket, her glistening eyes raised in accusation, under the title ‘The Real Losers from Seattle.’ Five billion poor people in

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“All It Takes Is Inexhaustible Patience, Limitless Time, and a Warped Mind”: A Conversation with Adrienne Raphel

Basically if you email any constructor you love, they will probably help you, or will point you toward a person who has bandwidth to help! Also, Will Shortz and his crew at the Times put together an “emergency puzzle mania” for May, a band-aid but a nice bonus gift. And I’m also interested in the

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Join Four Online Events in PalREAD’s ‘Re-locating the Map’ Series

Jun 23, 2020 | 02:00 PM – 03:30 PM Re-locating the Map: War & Palestinian Literature: After 2000 with Bashir Abu-Manneh Palestinian literature scholar Bashir Abu-Manneh, currently at Kent University, is author of The Palestinian Novel: From 1948 to the Present (2016) and Fiction of the New Statesman, 1913-1939 (2011). Jun 30, 2020 | 02:00

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Freud: A Star Is Born

Indeed, the second episode of the Netflix show recreates, nearly shot-for-shot, the opening sequence of John Huston’s Freud: The Secret Passion (1962), in which Montgomery Clift played Freud and which is easily the best filmed version of Freud’s life. In order to prove her paralytic symptoms are genuine — if of non-organic origin — Freud

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