Launching ‘In Focus: SUDAN’

Launching ‘In Focus: SUDAN’ May 2, 2022May 2, 2022 by mlynxqualey Edited by Leonie Rau and Nashwa Gowanlock This month, we’re launching the third section to focus on a different country or borderless region in the Maghreb or Mashreq, bringing together original poetry, fiction, and literary nonfiction by its writers; asking translators, authors, scholars, and

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Coming in May: Books by Maya Abu al-Hayyat, Jokha Alharthi, Jabra Ibrahim Jabra & More

He meditates on the lives of his friends, drawing from his memory a colorful cast of characters whose experiences reflect the outsized influence of religion and tradition in their lives.  Expected release: May 4, 2022. Then, on the day of his sixtieth birthday, Yunus plunges into a delayed midlife crisis as he reflects on the

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‘A Song for Syria’: A Collection of Syrian Literature from Kolkata Publisher Odd Books

Syria is speaking and singing and painting in the way they are because they have been pushed to the wall. Serious English literature, that too, from the small press tradition has not made significant inroads here.  A Song for Syria easily fits in with the #StayOdd moniker I have been using. We crowdfunded and pulled

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Excerpt from Mohsine Loukili’s IPAF-shortlisted ‘The Prisoner of the Portuguese’

Only dust was now carried along, in whirlwinds or below them, and it filled the sky with a dreadful dark color. Abdelsamad was the first groom in this bloody wedding procession. In the weak light of the sky, I saw my father walk up the stairs leading from the cellar to the courtyard. I saw

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Mohsine Loukili: I Do Not Use the Novel to Serve History, But History to Serve the Novel

* Mohsine Loukili   is a Moroccan writer, born in Taza, Morocco, 1978. My entry into quarantine and the epidemic sweeping the world was, on the one hand, a terrible slip into the past. Mohsine Loukili: My novel The Prisoner of the Portuguese is not a historical novel in the strict sense of the word. For the novel

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Crowdfunding Alert: Al Ghussein Cultural House in Gaza

It is sought to equip the house with exhibition walls, equipment for live streaming, furniture for residencies, restructuring / landscaping of its garden, suitable screening equipment, building a stage for theatrical performances, lighting system, and much more. Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditTumblrWhatsAppPinterestTelegramPocketSkypeLike this:Like Loading… Al Ghussein House was renovated and re-opened in 2020 as a space for people

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A Talk with Seif Eddine Nachi About ‘Une Révolution Tunisienne’

Arabook: Une Révolution Tunisienne comes with some interesting historical sources, which help the reader to frame the Tunisian historical context. Comics and picture books are extremely expensive here and there is not a real large market to tackle. The graphic novel has now been published in an Arabic editing by the editorial project Soubia. Maybe this is

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WatWat Takes Flight: Arabic Comics for Young Readers

This is running simultaneously at arabook.it, where you can read it in Italian. Since that year, the project has grown significantly, and WatWat has now turned into a website: a free-access platform that allows readers to download and peruse several graphic novels aimed at younger readers. In addition, the Watwat project has launched three script-writing competitions:

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Fiction in Translation: ‘The Baffling Case of the Man Called Ahmet Yilmaz’

He suppressed that desire; maybe one day he would be able to see the world through Turkish eyes.  Exhausted from his convoluted thoughts, Ahmad reached home, where his wife Fatima had supper waiting. Romantic Turkish soap operas, long turquoise abayas and embroidered headscarves of every color, beautiful fair-skinned girls, their veils draped gracefully, the poetry

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Things You May Find Hidden in My Ear: A Conversation with Mosab Abu Toha

So, these things show up around me on the stage wearing their gowns embroidered in the Arabic alphabet.  Do you ever translate your poems? I read the Holy Quran hundreds of times in my life along with other books. It’s about our dilemma as human beings. After graduating with a degree in English literature, in

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10 Works for 10 Years: Celebrating ‘Rusted Radishes’

If you can’t make it to the Beirut launch, ten works to celebrate RR’s ten years: Poetry:: Hayan Charara’s “Fable” Maps: Beirut’s bookshops Short Fiction: Zakaria Tamer’s “The Other Cave,” tr. Madeline Edwards Award-winners: Emily Khilfeh’s “Chanson Mystique” and Nur Turkmani’s “Body Parts“ Comics: Lina Ghaibeh’s “Intertwined“ * Find much more at rustedradishes.com. Support them

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Coming Online: Archive of Latin American Arabic Newspapers

Coming Online: Archive of Latin American Arabic Newspapers April 12, 2022April 11, 2022 by mlynxqualey Earlier this month, the North Carolina-based Khayrallah Center announced that, through its partnership with USEK Library in Lebanon, the center would be adding digital periodicals from USEK’s Latin American collection to their   online searchable database   of Arabic newspapers

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From the ‘Mirrors’ Issue: Hilal Badr’s ‘Ash-sha’b Yurid Isqat an-Nizam’

And here I am, standing at my windowsill, hidden in complete darkness, and I can hear an outcry from a man I do not recognize. I don’t need anything. I have produced enough books, and I have taken time to rest. My wife is flipping through TV channels, one after another. Or perhaps they are

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Sunday Submissions: BCLT Summer School

Full bursaries are available to ALL 10 participants on this workshop strand. Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditTumblrWhatsAppPinterestTelegramPocketSkypeLike this:Like Loading… Sunday Submissions: BCLT Summer School April 10, 2022April 8, 2022 by Leonie Rau Admissions are open for the International Literary Translation and Creative Writing Summer School 2022: The summer school, organized by the British Centre for Literary Translation, the

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London Book Fair Opens Today: Arabic Lit and Translation Highlights

Tuesday, April 5 The Good, The Bad, The Ugly: Translator/Author RelationshipsClare Richards. The complete list of events can be found at londonbookfair.co.uk. Omar Ghobash, Assistant Minister for Cultural Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Cooperation UAE, Will Mackie, Senior Programme Manager, New Writing North, Marilyn BoothLiterary Translation Centre14:20 – 15:05 Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditTumblrWhatsAppPinterestTelegramPocketSkypeLike this:Like Loading…

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April Translation Challenge: Konafa v. Qatayef

Join in the comments below or by emailing your translation of the challenge text to info@arablit.org. Beyond the religious significance of this holy month of fasting, Ramadan has accrued a wealth of various traditions and customs all across Muslim-majority countries, many of which have been observed and commemorated by writers of different genres, including poets,

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