Inner Soundtracks and Apparitions: Joe Bonomo’s Selected Work

Though Bonomo uses his brother’s fear for his own amusement, in some way he empathizes with the younger boy’s extreme reaction. Especially early in the collection, he writes about music as transcendence, as ecstasy, a sort of private spiritual experience that taught him how to be in the world while not being bound to the

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10th Anniversary Readings For Al-Mutanabbi Street

In Steamboat Springs, Colorado On March 5th – The Artist/Activist Janet Bradley Will Coordinate A Reading 7. In Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 31st – A public performance of a musical piece, Words in the Wind (for al-Mutanabbi Street) composed by the musician/composer/academic/activist Melanie Monsour. This reading will be in French, Arabic, and English

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From Parody to Hyperreality in Ang Lee’s “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk”

“If a bullet’s going to get you, it’s already been fired.” The novel conjures the capacious American affinity for violence and pleasure, realness and fantasy, the paradoxical romance with hierarchy and the promise of its toppling. More than just a narrative, Fountain’s story is a wry and parodic send-up of cheap patriotism, self-congratulatory nationalism, and

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Two Almodóvars

In Julieta, not a single word of Galician is spoken despite one of the protagonists’ names being Xoan — Galician for Juan — and over a third of the film being set in a rural, Galician village. “The best thing would be for you to accept reality,” the retreat leader says. Julieta’s lack of security

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LARB Radio Hour: Film Now Panel—Justin Chang, J D Connor, Gil Robertson, Cathy Schulman, Anna Shechtman

Connor; Cathy Schulman, the head of the organization Women In Film; and Gil Robertson, president of the African American Film Critics Association, and the event featured a wide-ranging consideration of the state of Cinema in the middle of the second decade of the 21st century, with particular focus on questions of diversity and distribution as

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From Pacquiao to H-1B Visas: Global Asian Culture and America’s Shifting Identity

FEBRUARY 24, 2017 I HAVE THIS FEAR that once I write about my experience as an Asian American just a little too much, I have consigned this writing to a shelf only to be read by other Asian Americans, if it’s published at all. As a reader, I skipped first to the topics I found

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What Lies Beneath: Jennifer Bell on Her “Uncommoners” Series

You clearly feel a connection with younger audiences. So you enjoy meeting your readers? Some of my favorite children’s characters of all time are bad guys! That’s a hard question to answer. Working at the retail end of the process allows you to place books into people’s hands. It doesn’t mean your voice is any

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The “Girls” Habit

FEBRUARY 21, 2017 ALMOST FIVE YEARS AGO, I began watching Girls. “Habit” followed by a *shrug* is not a sufficient answer for a show as affectively polemical as Girls. I recall how in the pilot the white ladies were the only ones who could earnestly discuss why working at McDonald’s was not a viable job

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Which Literary Festivals Should You Boycott?

I’m open to the idea that my answers below are moderately to very wrong; please add your own in the comments or over email. [Note from later: There was also a boycott of the Qatari translation conference demanding the release of the poet Muhammad al-Ajami. Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ There’s Something in One of

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There’s Something in One of Wadih Sa’adeh’s Poems

I know now what we never drew nets for our future, or its suitcase. “There’s something in one of Wadih Saadeh‘s poems,” the narrator writes in section 12   of Youssef Rakha’s Crocodiles, a novel with a Bolañoesque obsession with the shapes and shapers   of poetry: Rakha’s narrator goes on, in Robin Moger’s translation:

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“From Strength to Strength”: Filmmakers Discuss the Life and Ascent of Maya Angelou in “And Still I Rise”

You’re ungrateful. She actually moved back to the States from Ghana at the behest of Malcolm X. Angelou was offered the job for SCLC … BH: As the Northern Coordinator … RCW: She was invited to a luncheon at a club and the elite black women were there. She wanted me to see a particular

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From Medical Condition to Political Condition: The Story of the ADA

Davis enlivens what could be the dry account of deal making and favor exchanges with saucy details. She went on to work as an attorney in Berkeley at Disability Rights Advocacy, bringing forward ADA cases, and as a public speaker about disability inclusion and rights. Burgdorf’s article is only the most recent alternative history of

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(Photographer Spotlight) An Art of Uncomfortable Truths: Michael Kurcfeld On Andres Serrano [Video]

“I don’t know what it’s like to have a normal family, and being an artist you don’t know what it’s like to be normal, so for me normal is in the eyes of the beholder.” As an artist, this might be seen as an asset conferring a fresh vision not accessible to those whose lives

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“There’s Too Much Reality”: On Jack Womack’s “Random Acts of Senseless Violence”

Womack’s stark vision of the United States’s decline is an uncompromising satire that, perhaps even more than it did in the mid-1990s, forces us to confront a world instantly recognizable as our own. There was a riot in Detroit and one in Seattle and in Miami. There wasn’t even an enemy you could put your

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Tearing the Historic Fabric: The Destruction of Yemen’s Cultural Heritage

With no route to escape by land, like many Syrian refugees, Yemenis are internally displaced, either living amid bombed-out infrastructure or in makeshift refugee camps. While the Islamic State’s cultural vandalism in Syria and Iraq has made headlines, damage to the rich cultural patrimony in Yemen, one of the Arab world’s poorest country, receives far

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