Lit & Found: Hadil Ghoneim Talks to Trevor LeGassick

It’s likely a reader could easily understand this saying, without any additional explanation, but LeGassick discussed his domesticating philosophy that is, by and large, not currently in use:   I wanted to diminish the distance between potential readers and the work itself by making it look as if it didn’t have those cultural issues. He

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Online Extra: Arabic & English from ‘Solace for the Traveler and Entertainment for the Conversationalist’

He said to himself: “I walk, and I gain one donkey. Al-Mahdi asked the bedouin: Do you have any food for us? I’d rather not ride and lose one donkey.” He then walked all the way back to his village and almost died of exhaustion. At a time when people could not entertain themselves with

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Ghareeb Asqalani, a Founder of Gazan Literature, Dies at 74

His literary work was primarily interested in layers of oppression and alienation. Ghareeb Asqalani, a Founder of Gazan Literature, Dies at 74 June 22, 2022 by mlynxqualey Ghareeb Asqalani, a Palestinian novelist and short-story writer who Atef Abu Saif called a representative of “the generation that founded the short story in Gaza in the 1970s

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Hot, Short, & Fast: 8 Summer Reads

Also read a Q&A with translator Chip Rossetti. Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditTumblrWhatsAppPinterestTelegramPocketSkypeLike this:Like Loading… * Blood Feast: The Complete Short Stories of Malika Moustadraf, by Malika Moustadraf, tr. You’ll also want Djamila Morani’s The Djinn’s Apple, tr. * ArabLit Quarterly’s Summer 2022 issue, THE JOKE, ed. M Lynx Qualey (University of Texas Press) If you have a reader in

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New Short Fiction: ‘The Awakened Memory’ by Salima Saleh

She continued dancing even after the drums had stopped. Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditTumblrWhatsAppPinterestTelegramPocketSkypeLike this:Like Loading… I still see that house in my dreams, that heavy, sliding lock of the door to the room, that has to be pushed all the way in during winter nights. * The Awakened Memory By Salima Saleh Translated by Hend Saeed I

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IN ON THE JOKE: The Launch of the Summer 2022 Issue of ArabLit Quarterly

A number are shared here, from those assembled by al-Jawzi (translated for this issue by Sarah Aldawood), the tales of lesser-known jesters compiled by Brian Powell, to the tales translated from the anonymous “Solace for the Traveler” by Hacı Osman Gündüz (Ozzy). Perhaps the tour of humor presented in this issue can be best summed

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Sunday Submissions: Call for Papers on “Who Reads Modern Arabic Literature, How and Why?”

Travel costs and accomodation of all participants will be covered. Second, it calls for interdisciplinary approaches to literary reception that combine hermeneutic and empirical methodologies to elucidate the mutual relationship between literary texts and reading practices. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Readers, Media, Translation and Reception in a Globalized World,” will take place October 5–7, 2022, at

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Translating Al-Khansa: ‘Between the Scylla of Shrillness and Melodrama, and the Charybdis of Monotony and Cliché’

In an interview from earlier this year, he told AJ Naddaff, “I felt in the end it would then become some form of emotional vampirism.” * In Seale’s description, al-Khansa’s 40 poems that mourn her brothers who died in battle are “by turns despairing and defiant, vengeful and tender.”   She, like Montgomery, noted the

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Michel Moushabeck on Interlink Publishing @ 35: New Directions and Books as the ‘Highest Form of Hope’

I also wanted to share with English-speaking readers the beautiful Arabic and North African literature I so much loved and enjoyed reading while growing up. This is partly as a result of what Interlink is doing and partly due to the attention Arab writers are receiving from some independent and university presses, academic journals, and

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Remembering Muthaffar Al-Nawab: Poet, Nomad, and Warrior for Justice Who Fought from the Trenches of Poetry

Riding the night train that passed you by, oh, Hamad, I heard the thuds of coffee milling and sniffed the sweet-smelling cardamom. In these marshes, Al-Nawab communed with sympathetic peasants and fishermen who had suffered under the regime. They jut out from pages like bookmarks in a long book of twentieth-century Middle Eastern history and seem

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Chip Rossetti on How Mohamed Makhzangi’s ‘Animals In Our Days’ Displaces our Anthropocentric View of the World

Chip Rossetti on How Mohamed Makhzangi’s ‘Animals In Our Days’ Displaces our Anthropocentric View of the World June 2, 2022June 1, 2022 by mlynxqualey Mohamed Makhzangi’s short-story collection Animals in Our Days appears this month from Syracuse University Press in Chip Rossetti’s English translation. Without giving anything away, there are endings of discovery (“Brass Grasshopper,”

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Emad El-Din Aysha on ‘Arab and Muslim Science Fiction’: ‘Our male heroes aren’t criticized for crying’

He has participated in several online conferences on sci-fi- related topics, and has translated numerous novels and stories from Arabic into English. We want to shelter it from corrupting influences, technological arrogance included, which is a Quranic injunction. I’d say we place the spirit center stage. As Arabs especially, we love gardens and vines and

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