After You’ve Read Omar Robert Hamilton’s ‘The City Always Wins,’ 5 More

Robin MogerThis grim future history is one of several dystopias to hit the shelves, and was shortlisted for the International Prize for Arabic Fiction in 2016. # Zaat   (1992),   by Sonallah Ibrahim, trans. It resonates strongly with The City Always Wins, depicting an Egypt spun out of control, a living representation of communal

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Above and Below the Fruited Plain: On Edward McPherson’s “The History of the Future”

McPherson’s depth of research, the inventiveness of his prose, and his sensitivity to municipal undercurrents make this a first-rate work of social analysis. Kennedy and the different kinds of ugliness displayed in the television hit Dallas. Not so for more modern history, where imaging technology has become so ubiquitous and persuasive that nothing ever ends.

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Intergalactic Gothic

More concerning than these internal flaws, however, is the odd manner in which some commentators have remarked on the novel. Kalfař’s talent lies in his elegant handling of the three omniscient ghouls traveling with Jakub: Czech history, his alien companion, and the Czech literary canon itself. Jakub’s conversations with his hairy alien often turn into

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Friday Finds: The Poetry of Underappreciated Saniyah Saleh

Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Tamim Barghouti and Translating Popular Arabic Poetry into EnglishCategories: poetry, Syria Salih was born in Misyaf, in northern Syria, and her own mother died young. An excerpt of a poem dedicated to her daughters Sham and Sulafa “You Will Go Out of the Body’s Walls,” was translated by Issa Boullata. Her

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LARB Radio Hour: Deborah Nelson on “Tough Enough”; Plus Praise for “Motherest”

Also, Amelia Gray returns to recommend Kristen Iskandrian’s novel Motherest. A fascinating discussion about six fascinating figures in the American pantheon: Susan Sontag, Mary McCarthy, Diane Arbus, Joan Didion, and (the two expats) Hannah Arendt and Simone Weil. LARB Radio Hour: Deborah Nelson on “Tough Enough”; Plus Praise for “Motherest” By LARB AV –  June 22,

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Outside Language and Power: The Mastery of Arundhati Roy’s “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness”

Naturally this question did not address itself to her in words, or as a single lucid sentence. Anjum’s mother tries to raise Aftab as a boy, but one spring morning Aftab sees what appears to be a woman, Bombay Silk, in bright lipstick and gold high heels. Naga, who moves through a series of political

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Sarah Savant on Ibn Qutaybah’s (Probable) Raison D’être, His Lack of Humor, and Directions for Future Study

And I’m quite interested in chasing them up, and trying to see exactly how he’s putting together the book. It’s at an angle. But you really can’t do the same with regards to Turks. That they’re stingy. It was an argument, and it was written in a specific time period. Do you have any guess

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Darkness Nearly Beyond Words: On Elizabeth Kostova’s “The Shadow Land”

As they plunge deeper into this world, Alexandra learns, in bits and pieces, about Bobby’s past. She has her reasons to be there: as a child in rural North Carolina, she and her beloved brother Jack would spend hours poring over a book of maps of Eastern Europe. That was the last time she, or

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Evangelical Politics in God’s Country

On the other hand, however, an alliance between Christian conservatives with more secular Republican libertarians emerged, resulting in the Tea Party — or the “teavangelical” movement, if you will. It is hard to understand the vast evangelical support for Donald Trump without considering the complex ways that evangelical politics were bound to political conservatism over

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The Objectionist: The Life and Times of William F. Buckley Jr.

Throughout it all, Buckley relished his role as a member of the opposition — deriding everyone from fellow Republicans Eisenhower and Nixon, to communists and welfare proponents, to the ultra-liberal Gore Vidal or the extremist John Birch Society, against which Buckley waged a decades-long fight, successfully preventing the group from becoming mainstream in conservative circles.

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