Plenty

The sheer quantity of images (hundreds of thousands) that Greenfield has captured with her camera for the better part of a quarter century reminds us that there is often a very fine line between curatorial practice (an art that the film underscores when Greenfield shows herself working with her collaborator to shift through thick stacks

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Liking Andy Warhol: An Interview with Jonathan Flatley

In any imitation, there are mistakes, mistakes of contingency, or mistakes introduced by the medium. I talked with Flatley over email about Warhol’s prophetic relation to social media and branding and about the ways that homophobia continues to inflect canonical interpretations of his work. However, museums don’t typically attribute authorship to items in an artist’s

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The Science of Fiction: David Naimon on Ursula K. Le Guin

Le Guin from her final collaborator. David Naimon joins co-hosts Kate Wolf, Medaya Ocher, and Eric Newman and explains the backstory to his new book, Ursula K. The Science of Fiction: David Naimon on Ursula K. Le Guin: Conversations on Writing, a collection of dialogues with the legendary author from Naimon’s literary podcast, Between the

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Workers of the World Cup: On Qatar 2022 and the Future of FIFA

In Qatar, these men might be footballers for a short time, but they’ll always be workers. The players win a week off work to train between group stage matches, while the non-playing workers don appropriately comical outfits and invest more emotion than you’re likely to find from the average American soccer fan. Even the Trump

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Irrational Authoritarianism: Ismail Kadare’s “The Traitor’s Niche”

In the figure of Tepelena, Kadare similarly captures the psychic burden tyranny imposes on the tyrant himself: an angry, jealous man, who seeks the love of his followers but finds himself fundamentally unloved, Tepelena is abandoned by everyone save his wife, Vasiliki, his sole companion and confidante during his dying hour. Yet when Kadare leads

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Braving Every Storm: Lauren Groff’s “Florida”

Henry Prize Stories 2012, the narrator remains on her Florida acreage as a hurricane approaches even though the residents have been urged to evacuate. No matter what near-tragic circumstances confront them, however, they endure, survive, and even thrive, bolstered by optimism and tenacity. Night doesn’t just follow day, “time will leap forward and the night

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Teaching Rights Behind Bars

Arizona, the 1966 Supreme Court opinion that tried to set the rules for the interrogation of criminal suspects and their confessions. They were already branded as criminal material before they entered the interview room. Another detective comes in by prearrangement and screams at Thomas that he has to stop lying. Every member of our class

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From Hystorians to Bolex Dudes: The Many Descendants of Barbara Hammer

“Recently, I decided to call myself a ‘hystorian,’” Shy tells me. (1987). Titled 42 Butter Lane, the installation features interviews about the quotidian (wallpapering disagreements, anecdotes of homophobia) and shots of the survivor’s half-empty home. “I was born at a time when Shirley Temple was making more money than any other female in the United

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The “Intellectual Dark Web” Is Nothing New

Peterson has been the most fervent promoter of this idea, having stated on countless occasions that the contemporary left derives its ideas and tactics from a combination of poststructuralism and Marxism concocted in the United States’s universities: a theory of class struggle reimagined as a fight to the death between ethnic, racial, and sexual identity

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Literature Is the Minefield of the Imagination: An Interview with Gabriela Alemán

Because I thought the papers would be interested, I included a lot of “real” news in the novel — not just the elections but the fact that a lot of houses were falling down in the outskirts of Guayaquil, mostly due to the new port and the tonnage of the boats passing through. Working with

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A Holocaust in Slow Motion: On Kelly Lytle Hernández’s “City of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion, And The Rise Of Human Caging In Los Angeles, 1771-1965”

Certain books put me in mind of Le Guin’s woke utopians, people who, having seen the cost of their privilege, find they must refuse it. The chapter “Justice for Sam Faulkner” might have been ripped from today’s headlines. Without being tendentious or preachy, it exposes the vast structural inequalities that undergird our society. In the

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