A Sorority of Suffering

¤ Karen Brissette is a voracious reader and the most popular reviewer on Goodreads. Most of the examples are recent enough that they’re living memories to the residents of Beckford, but there’s a stronger point to be made about the ways in which women are labeled “problematic” throughout history that one or two more examples

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I Speak Therefore I Am: On Daniel Heller-Roazen’s “No One’s Ways”

Indeed, “Callings” evokes both acts of naming as well as the idea of a “higher calling,” a vocation or destiny. At the center of our own metaphysics, to an extent we might not previously have realized, is the anomalous animal with language: namelessly naming, ever speaking, affirmed by no–thing more than the silence of our

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Just Grace

How to believe in justice, to see justice done? One God, who was King of the Jews, who unravels the stars to this day with little hydrogen explosions, He can look down from His Holy Headquarters and see us all: heads of girls, ponytails riding the springtime luck, short black bobs, and an occasional eminence

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Disappearing Theatre: A Play About Palestinians in London, a Scottish Novel Adapted in Cairo

Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ A Jordan-born Palestinian Author, Writing in Maltese, Wins a 2017 European Union Prize for LiteratureCategories: theater “They asked a number of venues in Cairo about staging it,” Cormack writes. It ran for one night only, to mark the Nakba, and are a collection of stories of teenagers frustrated by exile, occupation,

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Grand Finale: On “The Poetry of Weldon Kees: Vanishing as Presence”

Irwin interrogates the lonely and isolated associations of the character’s name with Robinson Crusoe, Edwin Arlington Robinson, and the Robinson character in Louis-Ferdinand Céline’s novel Journey to the End of the Night, who also serves as a kind of double for the narrator. But what a pleasure to hear Irwin explain it. Irwin, too, seems

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Open the Pod Bay Doors

It’s actually a fake room that, in the film, was a fake room created by an alien force for a guy to live out his life as a construct. Science fiction is a big influence on me. To exist outside the established art world with no gallery, institutional or patron support on 150,000 square feet,

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Flyover Utopia: On Keith Krumwiede’s “Atlas of Another America”

Nevertheless, both share an understanding of architecture as responsive to societal, political, and economic conditions. Perhaps then, images of Freedomland should depict the settlement in continual rise and fall — its populace not mounted on steeds or wielding a sickle, but instead wearing hard hats and toting crowbars. MAY 30, 2017 IN THE DAYS following

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A Jordan-born Palestinian Author, Writing in Maltese, Wins a 2017 European Union Prize for Literature

It was only 10 years after he arrived, after meeting writer and Inizjamed founder Adrian Grima, that his works in his adoptive tongue came to light. Born in Jordan to a Palestinian family, Nabhan moved to Yugoslavia to study, back to Jordan, where he served time in the army, mostly in the desert, which was

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“A Sweetness in This Sense”: On X. J. Kennedy’s “That Swing: Poems, 2008–2016”

But consider the serious humor of Kennedy’s “Lonesome George,” devoted to a giant tortoise, the last of its species, kept in a pen at the Charles Darwin Research Station in the Galápagos Islands: No mate for him exists. Far oftener, a poem suggests its rhymes, Grants me a word with which a word might mate,

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“Men Without Women”: What Happens When Murakami’s Ordinary Men Grow Older

He only goes to the United States. Not long after her dream, the boyfriend, Kitaru, disappears and never returns — much like the way another friend, the Rat, disappears in the early Murakami novel, A   Wild Sheep Chase. The protagonists receive phone calls informing them of the death of their lovers. Although they may

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Fatima Sharafeddine’s YA Novel ‘Cappuccino,’ a Story of Surviving Domestic Violence

Lina and her mother help Anas and his mom through their difficulties, although   Lina also must tell   Anas about her mother’s decision to move back to Paris. Anas is also trying to be good,   so his father won’t get angry. Behind Anas’s door Anas studies in the German school and goes to

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A Town’s Own Story: Édouard Louis’s “The End of Eddy”

The book tipped off a storm of controversy in the French press, with some critics accusing Louis of vilifying a town and fabricating elements of his account. Eribon presses upon the ways in which sexual identity and class are strangely interwoven, musing in a more theoretical register than what Louis employs here. Our bedtime reading,

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Sunday Submissions: The $2M ‘Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation’

This is a prize that hands out a ridiculous amount of cash: The Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding (SHATIU) is accepting nominations for the year 2017, and this goes for translations from and into English, French, Chinese, Japanese, Malay, Farsi,   and Urdu, as long as the partner-language on the other side

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The Lyric in Theory: A Conversation with Jonathan Culler

This poetry was resistant both in its deviation from the norms of poetic discourse — both in form and diction (often obscene) — and in its themes of revolt and resistance. Austin explicitly requires “seriousness” as a condition for successful performatives. It is likely that they contribute to the formation of some sort of community

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Wine, Olive Oil, and Wisteria: A Sensual Tour of the “City of Lions”

Andrey Sheptytsky, the head of the traditionally Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church in the 1930s, was a Ukrainian priest whose grandfather was Poland’s answer to Molière. Near the end of his book he pauses to remember some of the literary giants of his youth. City of blessed memory. A batiar could belong to any social class,

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Just Like the First Time? Revisiting “Beauty and the Beast” and “Trainspotting”

Fortuitously or not, both were released on March 17, and I couldn’t resist the dubious pleasure of this doubleheader, seemingly designed for me and a whole niche audience of thirtysomethings who’d previously self-identified as “misunderstood,” or, in the parlance of Disney’s provincial townspeople, “strange but special.” As I walked down to the noon screening of

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