Escape to Vigàta: On Andrea Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano Series

After hearing how rudely his men are treated, held, interrogated, and kept without food or bedding overnight by the caribineri, the threat of a simple phone call of Camilleri’s puts the fear of the commissioner in a power-abusing caribinieri chief. Clear-sighted and focused in his investigations, slightly ridiculous and completely self-conscious when tasked with speaking

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Launching Sahar Elmougy’s Long-awaited ‘The Hill’s Musk,’ A Rewriting of Mahfouz’s Amina

Abu Almagd had strong reservations about the title. She says it took her a whole month to figure out a new title, though she admits the publisher’s was a wise decision. For instance, The Hill’s Musk   is the work’s second title. The Greek mythology of the “Sirens”   is Elmougy’s frame device, setting the

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The Collapse of the Postwar Compact: On Rick Wartzman’s “The End of Loyalty”

At Coca-Cola headquarters, located in the heart of the South in Atlanta, the company faced boycotts from African-American community groups. Today, almost half of the workforce earns less than $15 per hour. When those conditions abated or eroded, the longer trend of inequality reasserted itself. He traces the evolution of their employment policies through the

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“With Suffering and Love, At Daybreak”: On Mathias Énard’s “Compass”

¤ Dustin Illingworth is a writer in Southern California. His work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Times Literary Supplement, and the Los Angeles Times. Out of the ontological fissure of Orientalism, Énard’s novel emerges as a strange and subtle creation. She suggests the great scholar’s theories, due in large part to their reverential reception,

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“This Tale Is About You!”: On Bini Adamczak’s “Communism for Kids”

Communism for Kids will change this. Regardless of Foucault’s wavering, traditional Marxism frames revolution not in terms of desire, but of objective class interests and universal needs. “[G]enuine fairy tales,” the Marxist critic Siegfried Kracauer maintained during the Weimar years, “are not stories about miracles but rather announcements of the miraculous advent of justice.” Part

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2 Arabic Books Make 2017 ‘National Translation Award’ Longlists

Leri Price. The American Literary Translators Association, otherwise known as ALTA, yesterday announced the longlists for the 2017 National Translation Awards in both poetry and prose: The National Translation Awards, now in their nineteenth year, promise to be “the only national award for translated fiction, poetry, and literary nonfiction that includes a rigorous examination of

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Action and Emotion

Maybe next time. That’s Plotting 101. Humans are curious. The Prophet plays mind games and marks his victims’ bodies with the astrological sign for Mercury. Don’t do that.” Ax? That was the genesis of UNSUB. Killer dresses in a onesie and sucks a pacifier? Police officers who work serial killings can suffer devastating PTSD. We’ve

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LSD and Palestine in the Same Season: An Interview with Ayelet Waldman

A reader, angry about Michael’s position on the occupation, demanded his money back for all the books of Michael’s he’d purchased. You can read about a sterile street, but until you see the shuttered shops, see Jewish settlers freely walking on ground where Palestinians — who own the property — are forbidden, it’s hard to

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6 Arabic Poetry Books Forthcoming in Translation: From Adonis to Zaqtan

“On Exile,” a prose essay by Mahmoud Darwish. Mohammad Shaheen (Interlink) According to the publisher: When the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish died in 2008, his friends visited his home and retrieved poems and writings some of which are gathered together in this volume, translated into English for the first time. “The End of the Night,”

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Learning from Mistakes: Howard S. Becker’s “Evidence”

But works that represent themselves as instructional texts serve as a means for notable scholars to take positions in important disciplinary debates; often, the position taken in such a book is a notably clear, short, and constructive statement of the approach that has informed the author’s own distinguished career. Evidence is Becker’s fifth book on

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Another One Rides the Bus: Systems of Mass Transit as Vehicles of Protest

Since its inception, Friendshipment Caravan Program Coordinator John Waller estimates that over 100 buses — typically yellow school buses — have been donated to organizations in Cuba. Gayle (1956) that segregation laws on public transportation were unconstitutional. More will doubtlessly unfold in the coming years. They had watched drivers verbally and physically assault women riders

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The New Normal: On Dissidence, Apology, and Transcendence in Contemporary Chinese Art

He is pals with Duterte. Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Archives. Sinofuturism is narrated by a text-to-speech software which sounds like Portal’s GLadOS. Sinofuturism is the final piece in the current exhibit, “The New Normal: China, Art, and 2017,” at the Ullens Center of Contemporary Art (UCCA) in Beijing. Suddenly two screens fill with a room piled

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Comics Conceptualism

We shouldn’t ignore, then, the fact that Terms and Conditions begins with an adaptation of a page from Rex Morgan, M.D. But while there are a number of similar moments of what we might want to call anti-capitalist critique throughout Terms and Conditions — for instance, the Gene Colan–inspired look of blankness and fear on

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After You’ve Read Omar Robert Hamilton’s ‘The City Always Wins,’ 5 More

Robin MogerThis grim future history is one of several dystopias to hit the shelves, and was shortlisted for the International Prize for Arabic Fiction in 2016. # Zaat   (1992),   by Sonallah Ibrahim, trans. It resonates strongly with The City Always Wins, depicting an Egypt spun out of control, a living representation of communal

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Above and Below the Fruited Plain: On Edward McPherson’s “The History of the Future”

McPherson’s depth of research, the inventiveness of his prose, and his sensitivity to municipal undercurrents make this a first-rate work of social analysis. Kennedy and the different kinds of ugliness displayed in the television hit Dallas. Not so for more modern history, where imaging technology has become so ubiquitous and persuasive that nothing ever ends.

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