Those Who Care and Those Who Don’t: Children and Racism in the Trump Era

“Overall, I’m not saying he’s the best president, and he’s definitely not the worst. DECEMBER 14, 2018 This piece appears in the latest issue of the LARB Print Quarterly Journal: No. Based on his experience growing up in Mississippi — like Crystal — Charlie could also see a connection between support for Trump and whiteness. Indeed,

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Beautifying Beale Street

Accents of yellow persist throughout the film, such that they become a familiar, soothing rhythm that visually resists tragedy even when depicting it. While Jenkins does not retreat from addressing the rape of Victoria Rogers — nor from depicting sexism toward Tish entirely (at different points, she is ogled, groped, and harassed by strangers) —

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LA Stories: Howard Hughes, Starlets, and Outcast Punks in Dystopia

Now she returns to discuss her equally intriguing book, Seduction: Sex, Lies, and Stardom in Howard Hughes Hollywood. First up, hosts Eric Newman, Medaya Ocher, and Kate Wolf welcome back Karina Longworth to the show. Then Nikki Darling drops by to talk about her debut novel, Fade Into You, a coming-of-age tale set in suburban nowhere

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Little Book with Big Ambitions: Rita Indiana’s “Tentacle”

La Negrura they called it. Like Indiana, Díaz recounts life following an environmental disaster that has left coral reefs “adios on the ocean floor.” Except in his story, the virus affecting Haitians turns out to be a zombie epidemic that leads the United States to drop a powerful, untested weapon on Hispaniola, causing an earthquake

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Unringing Bell

The Bell scandal was the impetus for BASTA (Bell Association to Stop The Abuse), a local activism group co-founded by Saleh, Garcia, and other Bell locals that would go on to launch a recall against the council. What sets From Kleptocracy to Democracy apart from mere historical recounting is Smoller’s lucid explanation of the radius

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A Small but Important Job: Gary Indiana’s “Vile Days”

There are structures that exist to ensure that this, and nothing else, will be the critic’s role. Expanding Indiana’s presence in the list by making available works that had fallen out of print also seems to complement Semiotext(e)’s recent translations of novels by French, mostly gay writers from the 1970s and 1980s — Pierre Guyotat,

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I Hate to Wait: On Jason Farman’s “Delayed Response: The Art of Waiting from the Ancient to the Instant World”

By exploring seven different historical instance of waiting — from sending messages via the pneumatic tubes in New York City in the early 20th century, to the royal seals of Elizabethan England, to the New Horizons mission exploring space — Farman unpacks how waiting is recorded in various social and material cultures. Coryell’s final letter,

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The Window and the World: On Joshua Sperling’s “A Writer of Our Time: The Life and Work of John Berger”

Seeing also formed the method for his essays, where he often describes an act of seeing and the thoughts that arose from it. The revolution had to be lived all the way down. Produced in 1972, it was a throwback to the combative John Berger of The New Statesman’s art pages. He wrote novels. He

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The Evolution of Meaning: Adrian Piper and Victor Hugo at the Hammer Museum

Near the end of the exhibition is a series of large paintings of words in the process of erasure on large chalkboards. Victor Hugo, Planète (Planet), ca. Brown ink, brown and black wash, graphite, charcoal, and white gouache on paper. Research Archive Foundation Berlin. © Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. His is an art

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Eclipse Expeditions

For it is not for her own literary works that Mabel Loomis Todd is known. Indeed, there’s barely a mention of Susan in Todd’s 1894 Letters of Emily Dickinson because Todd took great pains to remove her name — literally, physically — wherever it was mentioned. She started a diary in 1866 when she was

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A Faux-Muslim Mission

The story takes a few unjustifiable turns and the power of its ambiguity dissipates into a mesh of clever tricks. In fact, the book’s tactful references to Qur’anic passages are so impressive that a few glitches here and there cannot be held against it. Ultimately, in its fascination with, and disregard for, foreignness, John Wray’s

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De-Nazifying the “DSM”: On “Asperger’s Children: The Origins of Autism in Nazi Vienna”

But for over a decade in the 1950s and after, that sense of gratitude curdled. It was within this context and working within established child welfare services that Hans Asperger made his career. After the war, there were a few feeble attempts at a reckoning. In the years that followed, he became a compliant and

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“The Most Exhilarating Moments of His Life”: On Charles Sprawson’s “Haunts of the Black Masseur: The Swimmer as Hero”

Whether recounting that in the Roman era “fish were pampered and often cherished more than human beings,” or that in the Elizabethan age “frogs were kept in tubs by the sides of pools as a means of instruction,” moments of calmly delivered humor reveal much about the author who puts them before us. have seemingly

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“Shimmering Bits of Thought”: Gail Wronsky’s “Imperfect Pastorals”

Almost an image for a poem! The Argentine César Aira is another writer making an appearance in the poems whose work is based on surrealist subject matter. What could be more unbreakable? Will the natural world and its jarring beauties offer a reprieve from despair? Echoing Shakespeare in Richard II (in the poem “Pitch-Pines or

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