Reading Dunya Mikhail’s New Book on Daesh’s Survivors

To save his face, he told her she could keep the boy she’d claimed was hers, her nephew, but not to tell anyone. We wonder if Kurdistan is like Narcissus: withdrawn for a while, but will come back to life again. Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Must-read Classics by Women: Two New Translations of Nazik

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Must-read Classics by Women: Two New Translations of Nazik al-Malaika (1923-2007)

An anxious silence gives shape, in his eyes, to cold indifference, as fever dreams shed light in strange, red-tinted hues upon his face. Born in Baghdad on August 23, 1923, she was the daughter of a wealthy and well-educated family. “Meter is the soul that electrifies literary material,” she writes in Issues in Contemporary Poetry,

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On Teaching with Classical Arabic Texts That ‘Capture a Sense of Marvel, Wonder, Humor, And, Above All, Adventure’

I use these selections from the   Expeditions   in my introductory courses (whether to Islam or to Arabic literature) as well as in my more advanced courses on the Qurʾan and Islamic political thought because they are foundational narratives. Here, in an interview that also appears on the Library of Arabic Literature (LAL) website,

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Ruling: Alef Bookstores To Be Taken Over by Egyptian Government

This is the same state-run business that’s set to take over   Daily News Egypt   by the same Thursday decree. It was announced last Thursday that an “Egyptian governmental committee tasked with   appraising and seizing the funds of members of the banned Muslim Brotherhood group” was set to confiscate the assets of 16

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Why Renee Hayek Should Win the International Prize for Arabic Fiction

An issue that is more important now than it has ever been. Proclamations of love Yara begins to receive text messages from an unknown number proclaiming love for her, which leads her to speculate that it’s the father of a boy she’s helping. The third sister, Rita, lives abroad with her French partner and doesn’t

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Sunday Submissions: The Gabo Prize for Literature in Translation & Multilingual Texts

The magazine   Lunch Ticket   is   hosting the relatively new Gabo Prize for Literature in Translation & Multilingual Texts: The prize is funded by   writers and translators, and was founded Allie Marini   and Jennifer McCharen, who launched the prize to support the work of peer translators. Poetry: 10 pages. ENTRY FEE:

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Saturday Summer Re-Runs: Egyptian Novelist Mansoura Ezz Eldin, Carrying the Mantle of Edgar Allan Poe

No one, she believes, has the right to impose their view on others. When asked about the story “Gothic Night,” Ez Eldin said that the theme of the story falls in a nightmare – an ideal uncanny context – where a giant monster wearing a cloak appears, rushing through the streets. She avoided despair by

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Friday Finds: Miral al-Tahawy’s ‘Writing the Body and the Rhetoric of Protest in Arab Women’s Literature’

Miral al-Tahawy   has published four novels, all of which have been translated into English and published by AUC Press: The Tent (trans. But writing came along, took my caution by surprise, and chose to uncover many of the features of the identity I was trying to disavow through denial. It was the body of

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Must-read Classics by Arab Women Writers: Short Stories by Samira Azzam

Paula Haydar) and   We Are All Equally Far from Love   (trans. Suheil Idris, a prominent writer and a literary critic, commented on Azzam’s Tiny Matters: ‘in this collection Azzam shows great talent, her writing can create an inspiring sociological atmosphere, she has the potential of becoming a great writer, her style of writing

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Sunday Submissions: The PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation

The award was initiated by funds donated by the late Bernard Malamud and by Gay Talese, and has received additional support from the family and friends of Ralph Manheim. Manheim is known for his translation of major German and French works, including those by Bertolt Brecht, Sigmund Freud, Gunther Grass, and Marcel Proust. Click to

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Saturday Summer Re-Runs: Alexandra Chreiteh on Writing About Menstruation in Modern Standard Arabic

The issue with the translation of Always Coca Cola for me was that, in the original text, I tried to make the prose as clear as possible, and to make it flow as well as possible. Of course the woman’s body is discussed there always as a metaphor — the female body that’s raped stands

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Friday Finds: A Conversation with Libyan Novelist Najwa Benshatwan

But I was careful to enter only competitions judged abroad and they were one way to gain recognition. Afraid and terrified to spend a night in prison with criminals, I travelled all the way to Tripoli where I spent four hours under interrogation knowing that the maximum sentence could be execution. It is only now

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Rabee Jaber’s ‘Confessions’ a PEN Center USA Translation Award 2017 Finalist

Ghenwa Hayek Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Must-read Classics By Women: 6 by Radwa AshourCategories: other literary prizes, translation This year’s translation-prize judges are Jennifer Croft, Elisabeth Jaquette, and Idra Novey. As it’s Women in Translation Month (#WITMonth), we’ll also note that half the PEN Center USA list is made up of titles by women: one

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Rasha Abba, the ‘King of Cups,’ and How Literature Lags Behind Music

Video of Rasha Abbas and Alice Guthrie reading “The Gist of It”   (Arabic and English) and Rasha Abbas and Alice Guthrie reading “A Plate of Salmon” Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Leri Price’s Translation of Khaled Khalifa’s ‘No Knives’ Makes 2017 NTA ShortlistCategories: #WITMonth, Syria Which is why I’ve reworked the Arabic version for publication

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Leri Price’s Translation of Khaled Khalifa’s ‘No Knives’ Makes 2017 NTA Shortlist

Its original Arabic was shortlisted for the International Prize for Arabic Fiction in 2014 and won the Naguib Mahfouz Medal for Literature in 2013. This is the NTA’s nineteenth year, which is the only US “award for translated fiction, poetry, and literary nonfiction that includes a rigorous examination of both the source text and its

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