LARB Radio Hour: Danzy Senna’s “New People”: Race, Identity, Romance, and Jonestown; Plus Toni Cade Bambara

Senna describes how she crafts historical/cultural geographies: of Brooklyn in the ’90s, Stanford University a few years earlier, and the nightmare utopia of Jonestown. Also, poet and choreographer Harmony Holiday returns to recommend Toni Cade Bambara’s novel The Salt Eaters. LARB Radio Hour: Danzy Senna’s “New People”: Race, Identity, Romance, and Jonestown; Plus Toni Cade

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A New New White Man: Toni Morrison’s “Playing in the Dark” Turns 25

It is that fishbowl that Morrison wrote of 25 years ago and not the careening bolt of white. B. Ethnic studies scholars have challenged the narrow, identity-based understanding of white grievance evident in Heinemann’s novel and Vance’s memoir by introducing new, comparative-racial frameworks that, for example, show how whiteness has been constructed through representations of

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Must-read Classics by Arab Women Writers: Short Stories by Samira Azzam

Paula Haydar) and   We Are All Equally Far from Love   (trans. Suheil Idris, a prominent writer and a literary critic, commented on Azzam’s Tiny Matters: ‘in this collection Azzam shows great talent, her writing can create an inspiring sociological atmosphere, she has the potential of becoming a great writer, her style of writing

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Impotent Rage: Eka Kurniawan’s “Vengeance Is Mine, All Others Pay Cash”

In her criticism of Hulu’s adaptation of The Handmaid’s Tale for The New York Review of Books, Francine Prose positions herself against those who consider the work a “feminist classic”: Watching the show, however, I began to think that it was neither a useful warning about the patriarchy’s hostile plan for women, nor a proactive

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Red House: The Rise and Fall of Bolshevism Under One Roof

Lenin. Radical changes to family life never took root, and women were not freed from domestic chores; the apartments fostered bourgeois domesticity in fundamental ways. Slezkine’s epic 1,000-plus-page social history begins during the tsarist days of the Swamp, when working-class revolutionaries and intellectuals traded revolutionary ideas in the warehouses and factories at the edge of

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Awaiting the Real Day: An Excerpt from Yuri Slezkine’s “The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution”

The majority of Christians continued to think of “the Second Coming” as a metaphor for endless postponement, but a growing minority, including a few decadent intellectuals and the rapidly multiplying Evangelical Protestants, expected the Last Judgment in their lifetimes. At 17, Kon learned of the heroism of the Muscovite revolutionary terrorists and stopped talking about

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The Silence That Remains: On Translating the Poems of Ghassan Zaqtan

And in the case of Not for My Sake (1992), Zaqtan could only obtain a copy of the bound galleys. Survival, remembrance, desire, resolve: to be “together, alone, in the poem.” ¤ The quotes of Jean Genet come from Prisoner of Love, translated from the French by Barbara Bray. The mother, especially in “Three Hallways,”

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Somebody’s Protest Novel

There are a few Palestinian writers with essays in the collection. Stowe’s novel did not do “more than anything else” to precipitate the Civil War or end slavery. Here, the counterfactual novel offers more strange and interesting methods for thinking about Palestine than this ostensibly progressive   political undertaking. Palestinians are either barbarians or nonexistent.

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The Marikana Massacre: Five Years Later

Because of his intercession on behalf of Lonmin’s striking workers, AMCU leader Joseph Mathunjwa “was generally perceived as a leader who could potentially represent insurgent workers,” Sinwell and Mbatha write. ¤ Alex Lichtenstein is editor of the American History Review and professor of History at Indiana University. Lonmin, the platinum-producing multinational that refused to negotiate

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Histories of Violence: Trans-Species Encounters

Yes, I would. The trans-species encounters central to your sound works intervene in the global-scale violence human beings are waging against other-than-human species by challenging the violence permeating contemporary social relations with responsive moments of egalitarian diversification. We can participate in it. They are making music. As a being in the midst of this, I

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Her Stoic Ferocity

Not to make too much noise or sudden moves. The first is that of a dead Indian found stabbed in his chest without money or ID; the second is that of Cash’s life, and how she came to be a cue-stick-slinging farm hand, playing pool and sleeping with her married lover. Cash’s world along the

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The Bird Has Flown: Sevan Nişanyan on His Escape from Turkish Prison

“I think the current madness in Turkey cannot really last too long.” In the meantime, he has four unfinished books to write. It is the Turkish state that is paranoid.” Nişanyan concedes, however, that many of the country’s best and brightest are fleeing in droves, whether they’re political targets or simply those with the means

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