Why Are Conservatives So Afraid of Higher Education?

Even more, though, precisely because higher education turns out the American elite, small disturbances in academia resonate deeply within the conservative soul. The political theorist Corey Robin has argued that reactionaries draw their energy from “the felt experience of having power, seeing it threatened, and trying to win it back.” Whether it’s Burke horrified by

Continue reading Why Are Conservatives So Afraid of Higher Education?

Long Live 007

Building from the Fleming franchise, Horowitz details the beginning of Bond’s signature martini recipe, the source for the gold-banded cigarettes, his love of casinos, his loathing of opera, the history of other double zeroes, and the missions to succeed at any cost. Though he never says, “Bond. There were three others (008, 009, 0011) before

Continue reading Long Live 007

“Innumerable Intentions and Charms”: On Gary Browning’s “Why Iris Murdoch Matters”

Murdoch’s most important philosophical book is The Sovereignty of Good, published in 1970. On this view, we first come to a neutral description of our circumstance, which leaves open what to do, and then choose freely among our options, expressing our character or moral principles. ¤ Kieran Setiya teaches philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of

Continue reading “Innumerable Intentions and Charms”: On Gary Browning’s “Why Iris Murdoch Matters”

Frozen as the Oceans Rise: On “We’re Doomed. Now What?”

No job. If my own children are the focal point of my fears about climate change, then my environmentalism is aimed toward a future that, like the present, favors me and my offspring. She received her PhD in English from UC Irvine. Even better, this “spinster ecology” productively reframes the notion of “limiting our desires,”

Continue reading Frozen as the Oceans Rise: On “We’re Doomed. Now What?”

The Numinous Has Many Shapes and Ways: On SITI and Aaron Poochigian’s “Bacchae”

made it an escape from banality: O which of the gifts of the gods is the best gift? In 1908, his Bacchae was the basis of the first English-language production of Bacchae in a commercial theater, with Dionysus played by Lillah McCarthy. In SITI’s staging, Dionysus crooned that one syllable “Ah!” over the king’s prone

Continue reading The Numinous Has Many Shapes and Ways: On SITI and Aaron Poochigian’s “Bacchae”

Restoring a Wartime Master: On Irene Guenther’s “Postcards from the Trenches”

Sadly, due to a tragic accident, the project never came to fruition. She is currently working on a book on the memory of World War I in the work of Otto Dix. As the author explains in her moving preface, her paternal grandfather Alfred, a poet, playwright, and journalist who lived in Dresden and wrote

Continue reading Restoring a Wartime Master: On Irene Guenther’s “Postcards from the Trenches”

“I’m Not Going to Pretend That I’m So F**king Creative”: An Interview with Eric Reynolds

I’m sure I’ll forget a bunch that really kicked my ass at the time. It allows me to do a lot more, to work with a lot more cartoonists, which is what excites me. There’s a tradition there that I’m trying to tap into, for sure. You find these things that you couldn’t possibly know

Continue reading “I’m Not Going to Pretend That I’m So F**king Creative”: An Interview with Eric Reynolds

Art and Dissent in Singapore: An Interview with Seelan Palay

I’ll hopefully exhibit some paintings based on that experience to reflect on my time in prison in December or January. I then proceeded to ask him, since the Singapore Constitution guarantees freedom of assembly to citizens so long as they don’t pose a threat to public order or national security, whether my performance that day

Continue reading Art and Dissent in Singapore: An Interview with Seelan Palay

Terribly Plausible

The city park assault ultimately forces Sarah to share her secret with the campaign staff, and get in front of the impending uproar by providing an exclusive to Casey Cheng. Is he the one pulling the strings, directing the attacks? These two women join together to find what really lies behind the hashtags. The author

Continue reading Terribly Plausible

Telling Stories and Telling Histories: Wayétu Moore’s “She Would Be King”

As the three stories merge, Liberia is born. Wayétu tells Eric about her family’s history in Liberia, their move to America when Wayétu was five years old during a civil war, her subsequent relationship to Liberia, and what motivated her to write its foundation myth in such a beautiful and mystical form. The allegorical tale

Continue reading Telling Stories and Telling Histories: Wayétu Moore’s “She Would Be King”

On Oppenheimer: A Conversation with Louisa Hall on Her Novel, “Trinity”

It’s the most complete possible biography — all the information is there. I’m not sure why: it’s just the only way I was able to write the story without feeling as though I was veering off into melodrama. Fiction, she says, can “extract the atom.” As I was reading American Prometheus, and all the other

Continue reading On Oppenheimer: A Conversation with Louisa Hall on Her Novel, “Trinity”

A Patient Observation of Human Beings

JANUARY 3, 2019 THE “WORLD RUNS on categorizations that reduce reality to acceptable representations.” This sentence pithily conveys the genesis of many of the problematic associations with Islam and Muslims in the Western world of today, especially in France. Truong’s is a thoughtful, well-crafted ethnography that humanizes the faceless, amorphous “Muslim youth” of the French

Continue reading A Patient Observation of Human Beings

Practicing Utopia: Recent Retrospectives on the Work of David Wojnarowicz

[…] Do people speak language a little bit differently?” Perhaps everything we might want to know about Wojnarowicz’s contemporary relevance is contained in this image and its attendant questions. The music from 3TK4 followed you as you entered the Hujar room, which documented Wojnarowicz’s long-term friendship with his mentor (and former lover), photographer Peter Hujar

Continue reading Practicing Utopia: Recent Retrospectives on the Work of David Wojnarowicz