Dreaming Jacaranda

Nonetheless, Sex and Rage reveals a more self-conscious Eve Babitz. She writes in Sex and Rage, All her life she’d skated along making most people think that she was not really there and would never be able to remember what she saw, or put it together afterward even if she did. Her debut novel,  

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Return of the Pirate Slut

Still worse, it turned her on. We have a short essay on the weeping middle-aged women of Seattle (“Who cares if it’s hormones,” one friend observes. As Dederer wrote in a diary entry back in 1989: “I want to be essential and be fucked as such.” Dederer’s childhood experiences were shaped by an awareness that

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Ghostly Parades in Lost Cities: Babel’s Odessa and Wittlin’s L’viv

This novel, admired by Thomas Mann, is one of the great Central European war stories, on a par with the works of Jaroslav Hašek. Both Wittlin’s and Babel’s texts are hymns to cities. Recently, Pushkin Press has made Wittlin’s essay the centerpiece of a slim, beautifully produced volume, City of Lions, which also includes a

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The Blathering Superego at the End of History

What became strange was the world. The present campaign within the British Labour Party to sabotage Jeremy Corbyn moves along similar lines: the problem is that Corbyn is irresponsible and can’t possibly win, a position that becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. The reaction of American liberals to even the moderate-left candidacy of Bernie Sanders reached its

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Making New Friends: The Genetics of Animal Domestication

But cats, dogs, horses, and other domesticated creatures exist in a liminal space between these two worlds. Were early domestic animals selected for their usefulness to humans (cats for pest control, dogs for security and hunting), and then socialized from there? In a matter of years, hormones associated with stress decreased, while levels of serotonin

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Sunday Submissions: 30 Maghrebs, 30 Years in the Future

Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Memories of an Iraqi Translator: A Russian Photojournalist in IraqCategories: Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia The next 30 years could be better then the one behind us! The results will be published through a new media online and in a book. Yet this trove of talents has found very little avenues to fully

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Something About Wanting: On Romina Paula’s “August”

News from Emilia’s brother back in Buenos Aires also calls death to Emilia’s mind. The text is full of references to Argentine and global pop culture, mostly to albums and songs Emilia encounters as she goes through the things in Andrea’s old bedroom. In a metafictional moment, Emilia asks, “What works better in fiction? Indeed,

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The Cult of the Clitoris

Australian urologist Helen O’Connell’s MRI studies demonstrated that the clitoris was not only an external hot button but also a structure of sensitive tissue that extending several inches into the body like an enchanted double wishbone. Mintz’s program is fairly simple but sensible: get to know your body, figure out how to get yourself off,

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“Islandia” and the Dangers of Globalization

The narrative follows the standard trajectory of a literary utopia, introducing a strange and perhaps superior society through the eyes of a visitor. JUNE 16, 2017 SEVENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO, a massive novel landed on bookstore shelves. By 1906, the United States has consolidated a Pacific empire under an expansionist president. Interwoven with John Lang’s travels

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LARB Radio Hour: Amelia Gray on Her New Novel “Isadora”; Plus “The Last Wolf” by László Krasznahoraki

Isadora flees Paris, traveling across a Europe that is itself imploding. Then tragedy strikes when her two young children drown in the Seine. The book focuses on two years in the life of Isadora Duncan, the legendary American modern dance pioneer. Also, author Jess Arndt returns to recommend a novella, The Last Wolf, by Hungarian

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Friday Finds: Two Views on Arabic-Nordic Literature

It’s unclear how publishing literature in Nordic countries would address issues of censorship or distribution. Are communities created by Arabic-Nordic literature? However, anything with libraries is good. Also, it is of urgent importance to adopt strategies for including Arabic-Nordic literature as part of the Nordic literature structure and in the collections of Nordic public libraries.

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