Los Angeles Review of Books Digital Editions – The Digital Revolution: Debating the Promise and Perils of the Internet and Algorithmic Lives in the Last Years of the Obama Administration

To close with Mazzotti’s point at the end of his essay: algorithms are now “the doors onto our futures”; we should at least be self-conscious about which ones we’re opening. This is part of the Faustian bargain. They’re tools for doing, as he puts it, and tools for thinking. They naturalize specific cultures. Julien Crockett

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Lebanese Author Emily Nasrallah Set to Receive Goethe Medal Monday

There is much more about Nasrallah’s work and life on her website,   www.emilynasrallah.com. From the Goethe-Institut: Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ 5 Libyan Women Writers Re-shaping the Literary LandscapeCategories: #WITMonth, Lebanese It describes everyday life during Civil War-era Beirut from the perspective of a tomcat. Nasrallah’s other widely known work is Yawmiyyat Hirr   (1997),

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Mortifying Miniatures: On Andrés Barba’s “Such Small Hands”

During the day, Marina continues to suffer the bullying of earlier, which increases with each page. In the novel, the girls’ “emotions are translated into actions, sometimes touching and sweet, sometimes cruel, even violent,” writes Lisa Dillman, Barba’s translator, in her note at the end of the book. ‘No parents?’ ‘No. Consider, for instance, the

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LARB Radio Hour: Imani Tolliver “Runaway: A Memoir in Verse”; plus Elena Ferrante’s “The Lost Daughter”

The powerful, emotive conversation (recorded on Imani’s birthday!) focuses on the redemptive role that verse, the community of poets, Howard University, the World Stage, coming out, and romantic partnership have all played in Imani’s life, all of which gets reflected in her beautifully empowering words. LARB Radio Hour: Imani Tolliver “Runaway: A Memoir in Verse”;

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Pulsing Instantiations of a Revolution: “The City Always Wins” by Omar Robert Hamilton

“Tomorrow,” the first section, opens with the gruesome massacre of 29 Coptic Christians in front of the decrepit state and radio television building in Maspero, the area named after the French archaeologist, by the Nile on October 9, 2011. Forget New York, the whole history of the world can be seen from here, flows past

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Dream Work

Some people might see Endless Poetry and want to ask you, “What is poetry?” But I would rather ask, “What is autobiography?” The film is certainly autobiographical. Chile was so far away, they were selling copper and powder for the guns. In the film, there is joy, but there is some sadness too. But, I

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5 Libyan Women Writers Re-shaping the Literary Landscape

After that, she was forced to seek political asylum in Germany, where she now lives. Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Reading Dunya Mikhail’s New Book on Daesh’s SurvivorsCategories: #WITMonth, Libya From Mahmoud’s “What Was Not Conceivable,” trans. In the story, a nurse   in the town of Ghadames falls in love with a Ukrainian doctor. Laila

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How Fragile We Were: Why the United States Almost Failed Early

Each of these crises exposed a potential crisis of legitimacy for the federal government. Britain was the United States’s most important trading partner; despite everything, it was linked to the country by cultural ties that inspired considerable affection among many, and it was immensely powerful. Providing any other military aid to France would bring the

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Tell Me I Belong Here: On Charif Shanahan’s “Into Each Room We Enter without Knowing”

Like the bird, the speaker’s many voices probe the desert, navigating distances. In espousing the parts anew, the body becomes less body. Shanahan is a master of shaping his dialectic through lyrical groundwork. That initial poem sets an unshackling precedent, even as it maintains a unifying shape. They are a group who refuse the body

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Safe, but Not Okay: When White Supremacists Came to Our Town

What if the white supremacists shot down that helicopter? They looked like they were on something. I wasn’t technically breaking my promise to my father. Different religious denominations offered prayers, and individuals stepped forward to make speeches. Your elderly parents. Isaac wanted to go but was adamant I stay behind. Some of it was true.

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Art as Target. Art as Grid: On Mary Jo Salter’s “The Surveyors”

But these stronger poems are more effective because they carry the emotional weight of personal experience. This is our house. Love and war come together in “An Afghan Carpet,” which, as we’ve seen, celebrates domesticity and beauty. I found myself freshly alerted, on however pastoral and manageable a scale, to a couple of the numerous

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Reading Dunya Mikhail’s New Book on Daesh’s Survivors

To save his face, he told her she could keep the boy she’d claimed was hers, her nephew, but not to tell anyone. We wonder if Kurdistan is like Narcissus: withdrawn for a while, but will come back to life again. Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Must-read Classics by Women: Two New Translations of Nazik

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Conspiratorial Realism: On Vladimir Sorokin, Victor Pelevin, and Russia’s Post-Postmodern Turn

If readers can look past the surprisingly detailed descriptions of sex with planks of wood or the exhausting reptiloid monologues that occupy so many of the novel’s pages, they might find themselves wondering if Pelevin has started to believe in his own inventions. The only artifact of this entire episode is the titular “lamp of

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Coming Home from Irony: An Interview with Percival Everett, Author of “So Much Blue”

It was good to see something different. Does film as a medium, for instance, shape your writing? The meaning of abstraction is pretty abstract. But to presume that I am smart enough to preach a position runs counter to my artistic sense. The place is full of film, TV, and fiction writers. ¤ Yogita Goyal

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Must-read Classics by Women: Two New Translations of Nazik al-Malaika (1923-2007)

An anxious silence gives shape, in his eyes, to cold indifference, as fever dreams shed light in strange, red-tinted hues upon his face. Born in Baghdad on August 23, 1923, she was the daughter of a wealthy and well-educated family. “Meter is the soul that electrifies literary material,” she writes in Issues in Contemporary Poetry,

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A Turkish Woman in the Oedipus Complex: Orhan Pamuk’s “The Red-Haired Woman”

The story spoke to them in just the same way that Oedipus’ murder of his father or Macbeth’s obsession with power and death speak to people throughout the Western world. The success of this novel, subtly staged, is that it allows us to consider how these ideologies might coexist. At the novel’s close, the son,

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Donald E. Westlake: The Writer’s Writer’s Writer

Unlike the racialized criminals of conventional crime fiction — from the paisans of Mario Puzo to the African-American and Latino street gangsters of Elmore Leonard and Chester Himes — Westlake’s bad guys are almost uniformly Waspish and unspecific, from the Carters and Fairfaxes of the Parker books to the multinational corporatist eco-villain, Richard Curtis, of

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