Friday Finds: Recipes from ‘Scents and Flavors’

Although presumably they have found some substitutes as, for instance, for ambergris. Not only is it much easier to make than filo, it has a charming texture of its own, crisp and at the same time a little crumbly.” Perry’s introduction to another of the recipes is below: Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Coming in

Continue reading Friday Finds: Recipes from ‘Scents and Flavors’

LARB Radio Hour: Abdellah Taia’s “Another Morocco”; Gershom Scholem’s “Mystical Messiah Sabbatai Sevi”

He discusses   his experience as the first prominent Moroccan author to come out of the closet, his love of Morocco, how he knew he would lose part of himself when he moved to France, and his bitterness towards French liberal society, which may be less homophobic, but is not tolerant of the young man

Continue reading LARB Radio Hour: Abdellah Taia’s “Another Morocco”; Gershom Scholem’s “Mystical Messiah Sabbatai Sevi”

Who Has the Right to Move?: On “It is obvious from the map”

Country names are in red, other place names in black, some landscape features are highlighted in light blue, and there are tiny cartoon-like figures of bus, boat, or automobile transports, human figures too, the border policeman, walkers with their backpacks. Seen from a little distance, these minimal maps are visually striking for their snaking lines

Continue reading Who Has the Right to Move?: On “It is obvious from the map”

The Meanings of a Quadrilingual ‘Glass Menagerie’ in Egypt

It is after this that Tom leaves home forever. As a theatrical experiment, this has the appealing result that every audience member’s experience of the play is different. Before the play started, a member of the cultural section of the American Consulate, which had partly funded the production, offered his interpretation of the performance. The

Continue reading The Meanings of a Quadrilingual ‘Glass Menagerie’ in Egypt

6 Reads in Translation by 2017 International Prize for Arabic Fiction Winner Mohammed Hasan Alwan

An excerpt of A Small Death, trans. Peter Clark, is set in a village in Saudi Arabia: When Ja’far’s father went to work for SakOil, I asked my Dad about these oil fields everyone was talking about. The last time I visited her before I came to Portland, I’d kept on at her about how

Continue reading 6 Reads in Translation by 2017 International Prize for Arabic Fiction Winner Mohammed Hasan Alwan

LARB Radio Hour: Kellie Jones “South of Pico”: Black Artists in LA in the 60s & 70s; Plus Irene Nemirovsky Recommended

Also, author George Prochnik returns to recommend the work of novelist Irene Nemirovsky, whose stories from both pre- and post-Nazi Europe are chillingly cautionary tales for our times. LARB Radio Hour: Kellie Jones “South of Pico”: Black Artists in LA in the 60s & 70s; Plus Irene Nemirovsky Recommended By LARB AV –  April 25, 2017

Continue reading LARB Radio Hour: Kellie Jones “South of Pico”: Black Artists in LA in the 60s & 70s; Plus Irene Nemirovsky Recommended

The Plot Thickens: James Shapiro’s “The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606”

Shapiro believes that Shakespeare might have been among the audience who saw it at the Rose Theatre on London’s South Bank (Duncan-Jones, for her part, suggests that he may even have performed in the play). ¤ Michael Paller is the dramaturg and director of Humanities at the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco. In the

Continue reading The Plot Thickens: James Shapiro’s “The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606”

Mohammed Hassan Alwan Wins 2017 International Prize for Arabic Fiction with ‘A Small Death’

More: Alwan’s official website An interview with Alwan by IPAF organizers An English-language excerpt from   The Beaver, produced by a translation workshop A New Generation of Arab Writers: Mohammed Hassan Alwan and Jana Elhassan 9 Questions with Saudi Writer Mohammad Hassan Alwan Alwan:   Book World Prague was right to honour Saudi Arabia Short

Continue reading Mohammed Hassan Alwan Wins 2017 International Prize for Arabic Fiction with ‘A Small Death’

Winner of 2017 International Prize for Arabic Fiction: Previews Before Today’s Announcement

The prize is set to be announced this evening in Abu Dhabi, the night before the opening of the city’s international book fair. The five who attended were   Libyan novelist Najwa Binshatwan, shortlisted for The Slave Pens; Iraqi novelist Saad Mohammed Raheem, shortlisted for The Bookseller’s Murder; Egyptian novelist Mohammed Abdel Nabi, shortlisted for

Continue reading Winner of 2017 International Prize for Arabic Fiction: Previews Before Today’s Announcement

The Other F-Word: On History, Memory, and Experiments in Armenian-Turkish Conciliation

Toward the end of that semester, we grew weary from the exertion of rigorous debate, and were equally dispirited that one of us had not yet yielded. I appreciated the way he shared his food with homeless people in his neighborhood. The annual White House Easter egg hunt had recently passed — as, incidentally, had

Continue reading The Other F-Word: On History, Memory, and Experiments in Armenian-Turkish Conciliation

The Girls Finale

Or whatever. Both are satirical while also deeply moving. I’ve already alluded to the argument between Loreen and Hannah. And it feels less like a radical departure than a strategic mistake. Hannah is definitely first among equals in that ensemble cast, but the finale treated her like a straight-up protagonist. Jessa’s moment with Hannah in

Continue reading The Girls Finale

‘Watermelon Boys’ Author Ruqayya Izzidien on Writing Iraqis into Iraqi Historical Fiction

I spent around a year researching and plotting The Watermelon Boys before writing its first words. All the hundreds of stories that could have been if not for the gender imbalance in education, opportunity, and social pressure. These books address Iraq as a disaster to learn from, a war zone, and – significantly – from

Continue reading ‘Watermelon Boys’ Author Ruqayya Izzidien on Writing Iraqis into Iraqi Historical Fiction

The Slide Rule and the Crowbar: Henry David Thoreau in the Anthropocene

It is hard to see how this Thoreau can be reconciled with the ecomodern optimist who would embrace the Anthropocene as an age of scientific beauty, or science as the savior of our warming world. Such simple material facts of Thoreau’s daily life, Thorson shows, often get lost in the thicket of humanistic criticism. A

Continue reading The Slide Rule and the Crowbar: Henry David Thoreau in the Anthropocene