“A Field of Strangeness”: Anna Kavan’s “Ice” and the Merits of World-Blocking

What makes a garden a garden (as opposed to a field or forest) is precisely the fact that it has been controlled. […] In a peculiar way, the unreality of the outer world appeared to be an extension of my own disturbed state of mind. And night falls. There is a description in Ice that

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An Excerpt of Khaled Osman’s ‘La Colombe et le Moineau’: ‘The Utter Madness That I’m Witnessing Here’

  Hicham. If truth be told, he was only pretending not to know the identity of the injured man. Osman introduces us to characters who are deeply flawed, deeply heroic, and deeply human.   With a description like that, this injured man could have been anyone: a cousin, a friend, or…well…a perfect stranger.   Finally,

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Where It Happened: Documenting the American Places We’d Like to Forget

So also with a concrete boat ramp leading into a river right outside Natchez, Mississippi. A similar haunting effect is present in another shot commemorating a Plains Indians site, this one a few riders on horseback making their way toward the place where, in 1862, 38 Sioux Indians were hung in Mankato, Minnesota, the largest

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Cactus Love: On “Xerophile: Cactus Photographs from Expeditions of the Obsessed”

There are cactus-shaped coasters, cactus-shaped margarita glasses, and a cactus-shaped bottle opener. The preface describes the images as “evidence.” A few are a bit blurry, either because of faltering focus or because of the low quality of the camera and lens, but this somehow only adds to the sense of authenticity. There are opuntia spines

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Ahmed El Attar’s ‘Before the Revolution,’ Where ‘Revolution Hangs Silently Over Everything’

Egyptian author Omar Robert Hamilton’s recent novel, The City Always Wins, explicitly omitted the “18 days” in Tahrir Square from his narrative. He blogs at https://onpaper.blog. Instead, people have been trying to find ways to approach it from different angles – to sneak up on the revolution from behind. The assassination of Farag Foda and

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Standing at the piano, Meynell says, “he would gaze at the performer, his body waving to and fro in tremulous pleasure.” As a young man, he had shirked his studies at the medical college to attend musical performances. The passage I’m thinking of is one where Meynell describes the poet’s love of music, which expressed

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Toward a Humor-Positive Feminism: Lessons from the Sex Wars

West’s insightful essay later led to a 2013 TV debate with comedian Jim Norton as well as her best-selling memoir, Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman, where she describes the fallout of becoming one of the United States’s best-known feminist comedy commentators, including her subsequent, painful decision to stop going to comedy shows. Mainstream feminist

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Sunday Submissions: ‘World Literature Today’ Translation Prize

Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrWhatsAppPinterestTelegramPocketSkypeLike this:Like Loading…‹ International Prize for Arabic Fiction Hosts Ninth Nadwa in Abu Dhabi, With New FunderCategories: submissions There’s also more information on the prize at the   WLT   website. Those who ware interested can put in their submission via Submittable. There is, unfortunately, an entry fee of $10. The World Literature Today

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Second Acts: A Second Look at Second Books of Poetry: Susan Stewart and Jennifer Chang

I feel it is important to focus more intently on early work, if only to appreciate how and in what ways a poet has evolved, something perhaps especially appropriate for Stewart, who has written discerningly about the primacy of praxis and process in the poetic endeavor. Second books make an especially provocative place to delve

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International Prize for Arabic Fiction Hosts Ninth Nadwa in Abu Dhabi, With New Funder

Ashraf Fagih (Saudi Arabia) is a writer born in 1977. He lived most of his life in Saudi Arabia before moving to the UAE five years ago, where he works in online technology and services and journalism. Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrWhatsAppPinterestTelegramPocketSkypeLike this:Like Loading…‹ Friday Finds: An Excerpt from ‘Al Hallaj’Categories: International Prize for Arabic Fiction (IPAF) She

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LARB Radio Hour: Errol Morris Explores the Death of Truth in America, Past and Present

As Morris explains, a society that builds powerful, secretive, violent institutions cannot also be an honest democracy with citizens who demand to know the truth — and what better way to deliver this message than an uncanny, six-part, binge-worthy, murder mystery. How did our belief in democratic ideals get warped into what Errol Morris terms

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