The Popularity of Near-Death Experience

Philosophically speaking, these are rookie mistakes. “Supernaturalism,” the authors point out, “has no monopoly on transformative power.” Here they echo the pushback that atheists (Alain de Botton, most notably) have recently given to the religiously minded who insist that a physicalist outlook must inevitably drain the world of its emotional or spiritual resonance, leaving a

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LARB Radio Hour: Frank Gehry in Dialogue with Joseph Giovannini

LARB Radio Hour: Frank Gehry in Dialogue with Joseph Giovannini By LARB AV –  August 11, 2017 Architect Frank Gehry sits down with critic Joseph Giovannini to discuss projects from across his career, including his rebuff of Donald Trump’s inept courtship, his ongoing engagement with the LA River Project (which Giovannini has written about for LARB),

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Transformative Suffering

Reviews have claimed that Iñárritu’s piece is pushing the limits of cinema or has simply transcended them. They walk so closely past you that you might feel compelled to touch them, upon which you realize they can’t feel or see you — but you’ve tried. First, it involves being aware of — understanding — the

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Rabee Jaber’s ‘Confessions’ a PEN Center USA Translation Award 2017 Finalist

Ghenwa Hayek Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Must-read Classics By Women: 6 by Radwa AshourCategories: other literary prizes, translation This year’s translation-prize judges are Jennifer Croft, Elisabeth Jaquette, and Idra Novey. As it’s Women in Translation Month (#WITMonth), we’ll also note that half the PEN Center USA list is made up of titles by women: one

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Friday Finds: A Conversation with Libyan Novelist Najwa Benshatwan

But I was careful to enter only competitions judged abroad and they were one way to gain recognition. Afraid and terrified to spend a night in prison with criminals, I travelled all the way to Tripoli where I spent four hours under interrogation knowing that the maximum sentence could be execution. It is only now

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Delicate Relations to the Real: Walking Donald Barthelme’s Houston

Unsurprisingly then, it’s Houston that’s on his mind in “Synergy.” His civic imagination firing on all cylinders (including at least one ironic cylinder), Barthelme proposes a Ramblas-like loop that takes in some of Houston’s best-known (to locals) streets and sights. was back at the University of Houston after his stint in the army, taking classes,

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The Feminist Uses of Narrative Fiction: Jill Filipovic’s “The H-Spot” and the Search for Women’s Happiness

Like the female lead Offred, the male characters also find themselves restrained by the gendered codes of behavior enforced by Gilead’s totalitarian regime. To this end, Filipovic’s touchstones are not critics who draw from art to articulate their ideas in the style of Judith Butler, but rather critics and writers, like Betty Friedan and Jessica

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The Gateway Drug: On “Triptych: Three Studies of Manic Street Preachers’ The Holy Bible”

While Jones’s probing reflections on the cultural contexts that shaped The Holy Bible and Lukes’s reflections on Edwards’s reading are both highly engaging, for me, the highlight of Triptych is Wodtke’s ambitious and staunchly academic final section. One problem for Lukes is that this group of listeners probably constitutes a significant portion of his readership,

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Riding the Tiger, Riding the Wave: Christian Conservatives and Radical Anti-Modernism

Teitelbaum is assistant professor of Ethnomusicology and Affiliate Faculty in International Affairs at the University of Colorado, Boulder. And that narrative, more than any uniquely Christian message, emerges as a common thread in Chaput’s and Dreher’s writing. He indicates that his concern centers not on same-sex marriage per se, but rather on what it allegedly

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Rasha Abba, the ‘King of Cups,’ and How Literature Lags Behind Music

Video of Rasha Abbas and Alice Guthrie reading “The Gist of It”   (Arabic and English) and Rasha Abbas and Alice Guthrie reading “A Plate of Salmon” Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ Leri Price’s Translation of Khaled Khalifa’s ‘No Knives’ Makes 2017 NTA ShortlistCategories: #WITMonth, Syria Which is why I’ve reworked the Arabic version for publication

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The Cruel Radiance of What Is: On Lindsay Hunter’s “Eat Only When You’re Hungry”

Hunter is not interested in symmetry. Or else it sounds like the distilled doctrine of an undemanding and likely unsuccessful diet plan. She knows that what puts the quarter in the jukebox of the novel and starts it singing is Greg setting out on the highway for his half-baked voyage, armed with only the vaguest

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Shades of Beige

I met with Betts at the Mixed Remixed Festival in Los Angeles, after she read from The Beiging of America as a featured writer. You see some of the generational stuff. And that’s kind of my hope is for what will happen with this book — that these are some narratives that make people feel

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Multilayered Maps of Modern India: Anjum Hasan’s Fiction

The fact is, I didn’t know the place at all. A pervasive disquiet reigns, without easy solutions. Her conservative landlord — who disapproves of male guests — seems to exist in a different world from the city’s Gatsby-esque parties for the absurdly wealthy. Afterward, that mall always held for me a queasy mix of consumerist

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Leri Price’s Translation of Khaled Khalifa’s ‘No Knives’ Makes 2017 NTA Shortlist

Its original Arabic was shortlisted for the International Prize for Arabic Fiction in 2014 and won the Naguib Mahfouz Medal for Literature in 2013. This is the NTA’s nineteenth year, which is the only US “award for translated fiction, poetry, and literary nonfiction that includes a rigorous examination of both the source text and its

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No Safe Space

I remember reading a crime novel that dealt with race, one where violence was inflicted upon a woman of color. I imagined her as a blues singer because she has that gritty, soulful sense about her. How does this fit in the world of crime fiction? It was a struggle at times, but I felt

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From Isolated Places: Fleur Jaeggy’s “I Am the Brother of XX”

Both layer narrative and lyric purposes into each line; both find the strange remote corners of the soul and recline into them. They’ll catch up. Families are so strong. Lonely people are often afraid to let their solitude show. She’s thinking about the priest who wronged her, who wouldn’t baptize her son. “The town has

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