No Fences Make the Best Neighbors: Collective Home Ownership, Kibbutz to Cohousing

Members take turns cooking and cleaning, sit on different committees, and hold monthly meetings they run by consensus. On leaving, she tells me: I sort of eased out around age 15/16. Twin Oaks handcrafted hammocks   III. Of the remaining 200 or so kibbutzim, about 50 are still strictly communal. Some of these investors might

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‘Under the Bridge’: The Hierarchy of Translational Labor and Two Poetry Collections

These poems are raw, panting, sometimes awkward, and throw the reader from the battlefield to home and back. The bilingual reader jumps from one side to the other: comparing, considering what might be done differently. Here, instead of being swept along by a loud passion, the reader must wait for the moments of transcendent charm,

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Return of the Naïve Genius: “David Lynch: The Art Life” and “Twin Peaks: The Return”

Present-day Cole recounts: “I saw myself. Against this comparatively happy, easy, wholesome time and place, urban societies have always seemed — if only at first sight — toxic. Viewers may feel far removed from the clean and remote technicality of film, the medium with which Lynch’s work is predominantly associated. Film critic Peter Bradshaw, in

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“Don’t We Know Our Own Minds?”: A Rediscovered Russian Woman Writer of the 19th Century

Overflowing with self-importance, Ovcharov considers himself one “of the foremost representatives of our generation,” a statement made more ironic by the fact that he has spent much of his time outside of Russia in Western Europe (the positive Russianness embodied by Nastasya Ivanovna and the less positive West Europeanism associated with Ovcharov is another Russian

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The Party’s Over: Looking Back on Communism

Unfortunately, McAdams’s focus on leadership leaves him very little room to examine the minority communist parties that operated around the world without coming close to exercising power. The combined notions of a vanguard party, a personal dictatorship, and ever-shifting class enemies on all sides set the stage for crime after crime: much evil could be

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AmazonCrossing Now Accepting Submissions in Arabic

Amazon’s literary translation imprint, the prolific AmazonCrossing has expanded its submissions website to cater for 13 new languages, including Arabic: It was October 2015 when AmazonCrossing   announced a $10 million investment in translating literature into English. Indeed, the AmazonCrossing website, which was previously English-only, now allows users to submit book proposals in Arabic, in

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Hollywood, Los Angeles Spies, and the Underground Battle Against Hitler

Alice Schmidt was invited to become a secretary at the Aryan Bookstore, where she “typed key documents, overheard key conversations, and then went home and typed reports to Lewis on what she had observed.” Lewis gathered proof that the FNG’s real agenda was to help take over the United States. Lewis was not always believer

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Coffee as Existential Statement: A Crisis in Every Cup on Valencia Street

These stern disciples of the coffee vocation seem to feel besieged by countless challenges — but mainly unappreciative customers. Javalencia is one of the few cafes clinging to the egalitarian days of coffee shop yore. Each option is followed by three flavor tones that read like a starving vegetarian’s haiku. Suddenly, Franzen finds a third

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Mazen Maarouf: At the Intersection Between Surrealism and Fantasy

As in his first collection, we touch the world of war through a child eyes. Also, the English edition of his first collection “Jokes for Gunmen” will be published in 2018, translated by Jonathan Wright. Last year, Maarouf’s short-story debut won Al Multaqa Prize for the Arabic Short Story in its inaugural round. Advertisements Share

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Beyond the Bathroom: Centering and Affirming Non-Binary Trans Perspectives in Heath Fogg Davis’s “Beyond Trans: Does Gender Matter?”

An analogous post-trans identity would insist on a similar irrelevance of gender to suggest that sexism is a structural problem of the past. Even this paltry form of equality has shown itself to be increasingly out of reach since Trump took office in January. Davis writes: When Farmer was accused of being a man in

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Sunday Submissions: The Operating System Seeking Manuscripts for ‘Unsilenced Texts’ Series

This includes “hybrid genre and scholarly work.” The call goes on to say that long-form fiction is “least in keeping with our interests,   but if you feel a work of fiction in translation   is strongly aligned with our mission, you are welcome to submit that as well.” Also, the general terms of their

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Street Fighting Men: Antifa’s Origins in the ’60s and ’70s

Bray does not provide a compelling answer to these objections. But in reality, as sympathetic analysts and even autonomist writers have documented, they were working out the consequences and limitations of the 1968 movements. Antifa largely takes the perspective that continental autonomist groups emerged without immediate precedents — a perspective strikingly at odds with the

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The Real and the Imagined in Douglas Rushkoff’s “Aleister & Adolf”

Symbols were either used for malevolent purposes, like Hitler’s swastika, or charged through ritual and used for the greater good, like Crowley’s V. There Roberts learns that symbols can be charged through ritual with enough power to exert incredible influence. Aleister & Adolf emphasizes the importance of understanding how messages are created, how they are

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What Snooki and Joseline Taught Me About Race, Motherhood, and Reality TV

I am not alone in this experience, either. On a formal level, this design functions to reconcile Hernandez’s Love & Hip Hop identity as a physically aggressive bad girl with her soon-to-be identity as a mother. It is Hernandez’s raw emotional honesty (she talks candidly about exchanging sex for financial security, for instance) that makes

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