Tired of Cyberbullying and Fake Rebels? There’s Yassin Adnan’s ‘Hot Maroc’

The titular “Hot Maroc” is the name of a webzine founded by the protagonist, Rahhal, with a couple of friends after university. She works as translator and journalist and is currently enrolled in a MA program in Editorial and Literary Translation from Arabic. She was also an exchange-student at INALCO in Paris and a Banipal

Continue reading Tired of Cyberbullying and Fake Rebels? There’s Yassin Adnan’s ‘Hot Maroc’

In ‘The Drone Eats with Me,’ Reader Between Surveillor and Surveilled

Another main character in the narrative is the faceless drone operator, scrutinizing every detail he can see from his faraway terminal. While under the bombs, Abu Saif meticulously records, where he can, details of war: the names and ages of those dead, the buildings destroyed. At the time, I was unable to come up with

Continue reading In ‘The Drone Eats with Me,’ Reader Between Surveillor and Surveilled

Patty Yumi Cottrell on Living in Los Angeles, The Best Way to Shape One’s Grief into an Object, and 7-Eleven Pastries That Look Like Vomit

That nauseating image has stayed with me for years. The rhythm of Bernhard’s sentences is something I want to study for the rest of my life. I think that’s really nice, that everyone can be a writer. I asked her to stop or to use some paragraph breaks, because while I enjoyed being in contact

Continue reading Patty Yumi Cottrell on Living in Los Angeles, The Best Way to Shape One’s Grief into an Object, and 7-Eleven Pastries That Look Like Vomit

The Whole Point About War: On Lara Pawson’s “This Is the Place to Be”

Pawson articulates profound misgivings about the inherently exploitative nature of war journalism. There’s quite a history of people like me — white Europeans — wanting to build revolutions in Angola and other parts of the world. Well, I wouldn’t want to swear on it.” She invokes what cognitive scientists call “the binding problem” — the

Continue reading The Whole Point About War: On Lara Pawson’s “This Is the Place to Be”

Women and Arabic Literature: News from Cairo and Casablanca

The report catalogued 3,304 new publications in 2016, including 497 academic journals (it excluded textbooks, manuals and publications in the hard sciences). “Serious” literature is, in most languages, a male-dominated business. 11 – 16 — put its focus on women writers, with 30 of the 50 writers identifying as women. There are some exceptions, such

Continue reading Women and Arabic Literature: News from Cairo and Casablanca

Business Feminism

They remind us, too, that these are the locations where oppression gets reproduced: the workplace, the legal system, the government. Pagano and Meredith told the two older white women they should read and display more writing by people of color in the store, read about the Civil Rights movement, and do antiracist work with other

Continue reading Business Feminism

Sunday Submissions: Paid Opportunity for Writers from Seven ‘Banned’ Countries

Advertisements Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPrintLinkedInRedditGoogleTumblrPinterestPocketLike this:Like Loading…‹ 10th Anniversary Readings For Al-Mutanabbi StreetCategories: #LIISSSY, submissions Spread the word! More specifically, they’re seeking unpublished literary fiction, literary nonfiction, and poetry from the seven countries on Trump’s “banned “list “that have been created   in response to Trump’s travel ban, or can be interpreted as such.” The deadline is March

Continue reading Sunday Submissions: Paid Opportunity for Writers from Seven ‘Banned’ Countries

The Accusatory Monologist: A Review of Mauro Javier Cardenas’s Novel “The Revolutionaries Try Again”

A 20-page chapter is composed of a single-sentence monologue, while two others are entirely in Spanish; an interview with an emigrant reads like a pieced-together audio montage; songs, chants, and curses, both in English and Spanish, pepper the text, which uses such minimal or nontraditional uses of punctuation as to make Cormac McCarthy, or even

Continue reading The Accusatory Monologist: A Review of Mauro Javier Cardenas’s Novel “The Revolutionaries Try Again”

Inner Soundtracks and Apparitions: Joe Bonomo’s Selected Work

Though Bonomo uses his brother’s fear for his own amusement, in some way he empathizes with the younger boy’s extreme reaction. Especially early in the collection, he writes about music as transcendence, as ecstasy, a sort of private spiritual experience that taught him how to be in the world while not being bound to the

Continue reading Inner Soundtracks and Apparitions: Joe Bonomo’s Selected Work

10th Anniversary Readings For Al-Mutanabbi Street

In Steamboat Springs, Colorado On March 5th – The Artist/Activist Janet Bradley Will Coordinate A Reading 7. In Santa Fe, New Mexico on March 31st – A public performance of a musical piece, Words in the Wind (for al-Mutanabbi Street) composed by the musician/composer/academic/activist Melanie Monsour. This reading will be in French, Arabic, and English

Continue reading 10th Anniversary Readings For Al-Mutanabbi Street

From Parody to Hyperreality in Ang Lee’s “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk”

“If a bullet’s going to get you, it’s already been fired.” The novel conjures the capacious American affinity for violence and pleasure, realness and fantasy, the paradoxical romance with hierarchy and the promise of its toppling. More than just a narrative, Fountain’s story is a wry and parodic send-up of cheap patriotism, self-congratulatory nationalism, and

Continue reading From Parody to Hyperreality in Ang Lee’s “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk”