Is Life Worth Living?

I look at that Dad and his son walking to their car and I’m thinking maybe I’d like to paint them, and also ‘One blood demands one Reich.’” (Actually, more like a sentence that Bret Easton Ellis — stop having opinions, Bret and go back to writing novels! My question here is first about the

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Free Time and Paid Work

This is that they sentimentalize informal human relations. Some may instead consider that a better purpose for society would be to restore capitalism, so that society’s surplus product might be privately disposed over in the form of personal riches or used to glorify one or another of the religions that Hägglund rejects. Hägglund concedes the

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Free Time and Free People

And this has consequences for how we think about socialist politics, consequences to which I will now turn. Neoliberals often act as if coordination can and should crowd out all collective action. (1) Is Marx’s commitment to “the free development of individualities” identical with his commitment to individual freedom? So what is going on here?

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Socialism for Liberals

JULY 15, 2020 To find LARB’s symposium on Martin Hägglund’s This Life: Secular Faith and Spiritual Freedom, click here. Rather than finding a hidden truth to these processes, Hägglund inserts a different notion of value altogether, the finite lifetime of the individual. Rather than advocate revolution and pursue the corresponding lines of analysis and organization, however, Hägglund supports

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What Is Democratic Socialism? Part II: The Immanent Critique of Capitalism

Lowering the relative value of wages and sustaining a rate of profit depends on a surplus population of the unemployed who are willing to work for less, either domestically or in poorer countries to which production is moved. No matter how benevolent my intentions may be, all the resources I devote to my employees count

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The Good and the Bad, the Honest and the Dishonest: A Conversation with Richard Z. Santos

In the early drafts I found myself trying too hard to be like, “This part of Santa Fe’s amazing, so let’s get the characters there.” Or, “What if they went to Bandelier National Monument, or the cliff dwellings outside of town? Way back. I spent a lot of time there growing up, but it was always

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New Brazilian Publisher Editora Tabla To Focus on Arabic Titles

(It’s good to be unfaithful! New Brazilian Publisher Editora Tabla To Focus on Arabic Titles The Brazil-Arab   News Agency (ANBA) yesterday published an interview with Brazilian publisher   Laura di Pietro, whose new venture,   Editora Tabla, is set to release two Arabic books in Brazilian-Portuguese translation this month: According to ANBA, editorial director

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Sonallah Ibrahim’s ’67’: Oppression and Its Unintended Consequences

Nearly all the characters come to the party burdened by their pasts, hoping for a new future, only to find themselves interpellated by the symptoms of injustice from which they suffered. [1] Robyn Creswell’s translation. The protagonist exchanges declarations of love with his brother’s wife but no sooner is love declared than it dissolves in

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What Was Christendom?

And it’s not that Christ was resurrected — Osiris returned from the dead, too. Even more than in the realm of mythology, Mithraism was crucially different in how it was experienced by worshipers. Mithraism, for all of the anxiety it inculcated among the Church Fathers, had some notable differences. Initiates marked their entrance into the

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Letter from Marseille

It took days for the bodies to be pulled from the rubble and identified, among them students, undocumented immigrants, a painter, and a mother of six. I can’t hear it without thinking of the expression “faire son deuil” — literally, to do one’s mourning — which strikes me as rather callous. One can’t help thinking

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Cringe and Catastrophe: Madeleine Watts’s Climate Fiction

She likes the film because it’s “so cautious, so small,” and because every scene seems to occur “in a railway station, a drawing room, a cinema, a tearoom, as though all of England were nothing more than cramped spaces where middle-class lovers could gaze at one another in anguish.” The narrator, who goes unnamed throughout

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French Connections: Hirokazu Kore-eda on The Truth; Joyce Zonana on Henri Bosco’s Malicroix

Kore-eda discusses complicated family dynamics, the relationship between art and truth-telling and what brought him to France. This is the first time the French novel has been translated into English. In our second interview, Kate and Medaya are joined by scholar and translator Joyce Zonana, who discusses her translation of Henri Bosco’s 1946 novel Malicroix.

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