Family Fault Lines: On Nadia Owusu’s “Aftershocks”

‘Mine,’ she says, and ‘I.’ She repeats me, mine, I until, finally, she catches a glimpse of her body that seems unfiltered.” In her experiences with men, she recognizes how the male gaze can be predatory and possessive, and she resists this objectification and appropriation. After 10 years of estrangement, Anabel meets the 28-year-old Owusu

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‘All Our Translations Are Prose Poems’: A Talk with Huda Fakhreddine

                              Tugrul Mende: What was the spark that led you to start writing The Arabic Prose Poem: Poetic Theory and Practice?  Huda Fakhreddine: I am interested in Arabic poetry, and I try to follow new publications and new trends and movements. I don’t see  my work on the prose poem as a leap. TM: Can you give us

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Kay Heikkinen Wins 2020 Banipal Prize for Translation of Huzama Habayeb’s ‘Velvet’

The perfect example is the beginning about the rain. The other four shortlistees for the 2020 Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation: Trees for the Absentees   by Ahlam Bsharat (Palestine)Translated by Ruth Ahmedzai Kemp & Sue CopelandPublisher: Neem Tree Press A Shimmering Red Fish Swims with Me   by Youssef Fadel (Morocco)Translated by Alexander

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Digital Immortality

The impulse is understandable, but there’s a fine line between consolation and denial, between healthy grieving and a kind of digital necrophilia, and Sisto is surely right to wonder if the proliferation of such technologies will alter our relationship with death for the worse, vitiating the sense of closure that the funeral ritual is meant

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Unfit for Prison: On Ilya Bernstein’s Edition of Osip Mandelstam’s “Poems”

Thus in the poem, salt is bound up with washing.  — Inferno, Canto XIII Blood-the-builder gushes From the throat of earthly things  — Osip Mandelstam, “My Age” ¤ I. The reader of a poem encounters them mid-dialogue, speaking not only with one another but also with their own histories. Thus, “wheel” in the third line

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“I’m Sure You Understand”: On Pavel Lembersky’s “The Death of Samusis, and Other Stories”

¤ Ian Ross Singleton is a writer, translator, and professor of Writing at Baruch College. Like Lembersky himself, almost all of the characters in Samusis are Soviet immigrants, many of whom pepper their English with Russian words or their Russian with English. The story could be a creepy thriller, but, as the narrator says, “Nowadays

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Sunday Submissions: Hazine Seeking ‘Art in the Digital Sphere’

Sunday Submissions: Hazine Seeking ‘Art in the Digital Sphere’ Hazine is looking for pitches by January 22 — although deadlines for finished pieces are flexible — for a series on “the digital world and art from the Mashriq, the Maghreb, Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Turkey, or Iran“: They write: Why have many artists chosen

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The Styles and Dilemmas of Advocacy: A Conversation with Paul Lichterman

It’s what Tocqueville was so concerned with in Democracy in America. On the other hand, when your campaign is fighting back against exploitative property developers in Los Angeles, that’s never going to be accomplished in a two-year fight with City Council. What we tend to do is divide these groups up and just say: These

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Barjeel Prize-winning Poems Now on ‘Rusted Radishes’

Read all twelve poems at rustedradishes.com. Barjeel Prize-winning Poems Now on ‘Rusted Radishes’ The winners and runners-up of the inaugural Barjeel Poetry Prize — twelve in all — appeared this week on the Beirut-based magazine Rusted Radishes: The poems — written in English and Arabic, by teens and adults from around the world — each

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The Ineluctable Agon of Desire: Joyce Carol Oates’s Suspense Fiction

Her 1987 book Lives of the Twins was scheduled to be released as by “Rosamond Smith,” but shortly before publication, Oates’s cover was blown, causing some consternation among her agent and editors. In a career that has spanned six decades and has seen the publication of almost 80 novels and probably close to 500 short

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“When They Go Low, We Go High”: Keeping Calm in the Critical Race Memoir

She also conceded that Black nationalist organizations and other protest groups were right to push conspiracy theories about the targeting of Black youth by the police, given the district attorney’s use of coerced statements extracted from minors with no legal representation to frame five Black teenagers. The memoir’s tone of centrist idealism reinforces Thompson’s commitment

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Friday Finds: Wajdi al-Ahdal’s ‘Saghira’s Laws’

Read the story here: Saghira’s Laws It opens: Shortly after the conclusion of the Yemeni National Dialogue Conference at the beginning of 2014, there appeared in the media an announcement for an open position: “Man or woman wanted for the position of President of the Republic. Applicant must hold Yemeni citizenship, possess excellent reading and

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Capitalist Naturalism

The extensive portrayals of the poor in Hurricane Season hearken back to the way the working classes were depicted in the novels of such classic naturalist authors as Émile Zola. Her style, too, is reminiscent of the naturalists’ scientific approach, capturing the distinctive local dialect, with its unflinching barrage of obscenities and slang (wonderfully evoked

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A Fabricating Tyrant?: On Elizabeth Mitchell’s “Lincoln’s Lie”

Confederate soldiers, determined to die for their cause, refused to believe written and verbal reports of defeat. “Every New Yorker was sure to tremble at a renewal of the draft,” Elizabeth Mitchell writes, “given that Lincoln’s first draft, less than a year before, had turned New York’s streets into blood-soaked, charred avenues of terror when

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