Field Notes and Flying Machines: On Te-Ping Chen’s “Land of Big Numbers”

(So also Yu Hua, who wryly describes in China in Ten Words what it was like to grow up in an era of street fights, public shaming, and competitive loyalty to the Leader.) “If you want to understand your own country, then you’ve already stepped on the path to criminality,” says a young character called

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Subverting the Canon of Patriarchy: Lesya Ukrainka’s Revisionist Mythmaking

She holds a PhD in English and Comparative Literature from Birkbeck, University of London. Twining Ukrainian anticolonial subtext and European cultural context, Ukrainka also undermined the masculinist underpinnings of some familiar plots. What enchants Mavka is the boy’s musical gift: his song brings the forest to life in a scene reminiscent of the powerful retelling

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Black Germans and the Politics of Diaspora: On Tiffany Florvil’s “Mobilizing Black Germany”

In a press release condemning the violence, the Initiative of Black Germans (ISD) inveighed against the “grotesque” irony that “news of racist police violence in the United States reaches us [and yet] the racist violence of German police is not thematized, or is even doubted.” White Germans today (and more than a few foreigners) prefer

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Summoned to the Stand: On Erica McAlpine’s “The Poet’s Mistake”

Pleasingly, too, she writes in a cogent and jargon-free prose, her sentences mostly uncluttered and approachable, in contrast to a number of the academic disquisitions she cites. Less convincing, however, is the not quite fully expressed sense that had Bishop been forced, either by the red pen-wielding staffers or her own sense of Hardyesque rectitude,

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Linguistic Embodiment: A Talk with Lisa J. White and Mahmoud Shaltout

LW: Students of Arabic as a Second Language can begin using this book at the high elementary level with the help of a teacher, or on their own at the intermediate level and beyond. It was also during that intervening decade that I began combing through the constellations of vocabulary that individual body parts generate

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An Empire of Stupidity: On Dubravka Ugrešić’s “The Age of Skin”

Democracy, she suggests, heralds a new form of corruption. I have borne and will bear all the consequences of my views alone.” Ultimately, The Age of Skin is a book about historical grief, about the trauma of war and separation, and, finally, the unbearable burden of watching from exile as “this whole ‘glorious’ struggle of

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Freethinkers Versus the Monsterverse: An Excerpt from “The New Enlightenment”

B. The fact is, our mainstream television networks, radio broadcasters, newspapers, press agencies, and magazines have missed and/or avoided essentially every critical story for the last 30 years. Solzhenitsyn, The Oak and the Calf: Sketches of a Literary Life in the Soviet Union (New York: Harper & Row, 1975), 284.   [12] István Rév, Retroactive

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I Knocked on the Window and Waved: An Interview with Suleika Jaouad

It’s a cumbersome instrument to say the least, and it requires a physicality that I didn’t possess. (We should all have one of those.) Still, it can be hard to let go. The Isolation Journals is a community creativity project conceived in the early days of COVID-19, which over 100,000 people from more than 100

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Publication Day: Ramy al-Asheq’s ‘My Heart Became a Bomb’

“ We Need ‘A Place We Can Represent Ourselves’ “And the problem is that a lot of authors follow this way of writing, and they started writing what the Europeans expect and what they want to read. Publication Day: Ramy al-Asheq’s ‘My Heart Became a Bomb’ To celebrate the publication day of Ramy al-Asheq’s My

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All Souls Rising

And this is more than fighting to exist; more than revolt and war and human odds. — Margaret Walker, “The Struggle Staggers Us”   ¤ IN THE FALL OF 1970, when I entered high school in Chicago, I was introduced to Margaret Walker’s poetry through an anthology, Abraham Chapman’s edited collection Black Voices: An Anthology of

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Sunday Submissions: Kendeka Prize for African Literature

Organizers say that the remaining two shortlisted stories will receive Kshs 5,000 (or around 40 euro) each. The prize is set to be awarded at a ceremony to be held during the Nairobi International Book Fair, which last year was held virtually between September 24-26. For more details, visit www.solanopublications.com Sunday Submissions: Kendeka Prize for African

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