The Great White Reunion: On Duncan Bell’s “Dreamworlds of Race”

Perhaps the most important contribution of Dreamworlds of Race is its conceptualization of the Anglo-Saxon race as a “biocultural assemblage, a hybrid compound of ‘cultural’ and ‘biological’ claims about human evolutionary history, individual and collective character, comportment, mental capacity, and physiognomy,” all adumbrated by whiteness. Born in Scotland, he migrated to the United States when

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Reading for Unreadability: Racializing Asians During the Long Cold War

Thus, in Ono, Xiang does not see a case study in how guilt somehow defines Japaneseness, but an Ishiguro protagonist who strives toward distinctiveness but fails, revealing the “perceptual illusion” of race and character. If glossing Taipei, Xiang would perhaps read Paul’s loneliness, his realization that “technology had begun for him to mostly only indicate

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New: Samira Azzam Collection Forthcoming from ALQ Books

As scholar   Joseph Farag writes in “Samira Azzam’s ‘Man and His Alarm Clock,’” it was in Beirut that Azzam   would “emerge as one of the   first and pre-eminent Palestinian literary voices in the wake of the Nakba of 1948.” Azzam was also an acclaimed translator, bringing English-language classics into Arabic. Scholar Joseph

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The Disappointed

Both fed them on lynchings, murder, sex crimes, explosions, wrecks, love nests, fires, miracles, revolutions, wars. What did it really mean? At a remove from all the glitter and glamour, he took in the reality of lumpen Los Angeles: the loony health cults, the slack boredom and free-floating credulity and mounting resentments of sunstruck transplanted

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Endless Constellations: On “Women in Concrete Poetry 1959–1979”

Working with only portions of letters — an E’s central tier or the new-moon portion of a semicolon, her use of fractured text rarely converges to create meaning. Katalin Ladik, “Wildflowers” (1978) In the 20th century, it became widely possible for ordinary people to make language without sound, to speak without the mouth. Grouped as

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Letters to the Editor: Clifford Thompson Responds to Joel Rhone

His book What It is: Race, Family, and One Thinking Black Man’s Blues was published in 2019. He is the author of “Bringing it Back to Baldwin: Myth, Memoir, and America’s Racial Reckoning,” recently featured in The Drift magazine. I won’t say anything further about this fact. My idea is that the country needs that approach very

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Free Speech and the Question of Race

On an individual level, Nossel recommends a variety of steps users can take to be responsible online citizens, including following reliable news reports on platform’s products, operations, and terms of service; expressing oneself publicly and within ones circle of influence on issues that matter; asking questions about how the platforms work; voicing outrage when user

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Crisis as Freedom: Muhammad Iqbal and Walter Benjamin

Iqbal does something similar in his discussion of divine knowledge and time. To ask these questions is to defy the circumstances that brought us economic collapse, environmental catastrophe, and a resurgence of right-wing fascism, all exacerbated by the global pandemic. For in it every second was the narrow gate, through which the Messiah could enter.”

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Sunday Submissions: Lunch Ticket’s Literary Translation Contest, the ‘Gabo Prize’

Sunday Submissions: Lunch Ticket’s Literary Translation Contest, the ‘Gabo Prize’ The submissions window for Lunch Ticket’s literary translation contest, the Gabo Prize, is open through January 31: The write: “The winner, selected by a guest judge, will receive $200, and the winning piece will be published alongside two semi-finalists in the upcoming issue of  

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Unknown Cities: On Daniel Mendelsohn’s “Three Rings”

“[A]s in some version of Zeno’s paradox,” Mendelsohn explains, “no amount of writing can deliver us.” At a crucial moment in his analysis of The Rings of Saturn, Mendelsohn connects Sebald’s novel to Penelope’s efforts to hold off the suitors in Book Two of the Odyssey: Because weaving often features in Greek literature as a

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The Death of the Future: On Nnedi Okorafor’s “Remote Control”

The seed that was her gift turns out to make her destroy everything she loved. Through unexplained means, the seed conveys fatal power to the young girl. JANUARY 23, 2021 “IT IS ME,” she called. Magic and science jostle with one another; Africa is explored in an American idiom; technology and culture feature in a

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Gritty and Glittery

Then again, that’s not Riedel’s beat. Under his leadership, the group worked to “brand” Broadway as an essential New York City destination. Have increasingly long-running shows stifled the creativity of new theater artists? Still, looking out at the Broadway landscape Disney helped create, no honest theater person can dismiss it outright. His was a dependably

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Saturday Events: ‘A Poem in Arabic, Not an Arabic Poem’

We will continue this feature as long as there are so many events accessible online; please send your recommendations to info@arablit.org. Thanks to Daniel Behar for passing this on. Saturday Events: ‘A Poem in Arabic, Not an Arabic Poem’ Dartmouth College’s open Middle Eastern literature lecture series starts on Wednesday, January 27, with a talk

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The Anatomy of the LSD Romance in the 1970s: On Errol Morris’s “My Psychedelic Love Story”

Errol Morris’s new film, My Psychedelic Love Story, boldly chronicles Harcourt-Smith’s troubled childhood and her intensely fraught romance with psychologist and psychedelic drug advocate Timothy Leary in the true decade of excess: the 1970s. This is the point in the film where she shows her grit and determination. As Leary is put on trial and

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A Premature Eulogy for Privacy

boyd contends that kids sometimes disclose lots of information for purposes of obfuscation: to make it hard for prying eyes to differentiate signal from noise. While DeBrabander is right that many accounts of privacy at least implicitly overestimate how much autonomy individuals can possess, Cohen’s analysis clarifies why he fails to appreciate the personal, interpersonal,

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